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Daily Economics: How to run a roadside dosa business (and make it big)
 
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A weekly series exploring the daily economics of small businesses in India.
Views: 412874 Scroll.in
The Real Adam Smith: Ideas That Changed The World - Full Video
 
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The Real Adam Smith: A Personal Exploration by Johan Norberg, takes an intriguing, two-part look at Smith and the evolution and relevance of his ideas today, both economic and ethical. It’s difficult to imagine that a man who lived with horse drawn carriages and sailing ships would foresee our massive 21st century global market exchange, much less the relationship between markets and morality. But Adam Smith was no ordinary 18th century figure. Considered the “father of modern economics,” Smith was first and foremost a moral philosopher. The revolutionary ideas he penned in The Wealth of Nations and The Theory of Moral Sentiments, changed the world. Norberg explores Smith’s insights regarding free trade and the nature of wealth to the present, where they are thriving and driving the world’s economy. In the second hour, Ideas That Changed The World, Norberg traces Smith’s insights regarding the benefits of free trade and the nature of wealth to the present, where they are currently in operation. He talks with some of the most distinguished Adam Smith scholars, as well as leaders of some of the world’s most admired companies to discover how Smith’s ideas continue to be relevant and drive the global economy today. Check out our Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/FreeToChooseNetwork Visit our media website to find other programs here: http://freetochoosemedia.org/index.php Connect with us on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/FreeToChooseNet Learn more about our company here: http://freetochoosenetwork.org Shop for related products here: http://www.freetochoose.net Stream from FreeToChoose.TV here: http://freetochoose.tv Learn more about Adam Smith here: http://therealadamsmithfilm.com
Views: 463650 Free To Choose Network
The Economist
 
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A quick history as to what has happened to "The Economist," why it's no longer a magazine about economics, and why there is really no reason to subscribe to it any longer.
Views: 2538 AaronClarey
Why do competitors open their stores next to one another? - Jac de Haan
 
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View full lesson on ed.ted.com - http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-do-competitors-open-their-stores-next-to-one-another-jac-de-haan Why are all the gas stations, cafes and restaurants in one crowded spot? As two competitive cousins vie for ice-cream-selling domination on one small beach, discover how game theory and the Nash Equilibrium inform these retail hotspots. Lesson by Jac de Haan, animation by Luke Rowsell.
Views: 3489367 TED-Ed
1988 Economist One World Currency In 2018 - Phoenix Coin
 
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The Economist: "Get Ready For A World Currency By 2018" Get Ready for the Phoenix - January 9, 1988, Vol. 306, pp 9-10 THIRTY years from now, Americans, Japanese, Europeans, and people in many other rich countries, and some relatively poor ones will probably be paying for their shopping with the same currency. Prices will be quoted not in dollars, yen or D-marks but in, let’s say, the phoenix. The phoenix will be favored by companies and shoppers because it will be more convenient than today’s national currencies, which by then will seem a quaint cause of much disruption to economic life in the last twentieth century. http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-07-09/economist-get-ready-world-currency-2018 India’s RBI Moves Towards Providing Digital Currencies Legal Tender Status https://cointelegraph.com/news/indias-rbi-moves-towards-providing-digital-currencies-legal-tender-status Venezuela is Creating a Digital Currency to End Their Financial Crisis https://futurism.com/venezuelan-president-announces-digital-currency-backed-oil-reserves/ China’s central bank is developing its own digital currency, even as it bans bitcoin and private cryptos http://www.scmp.com/business/companies/article/2118468/chinas-central-bank-studying-its-own-digital-currency-even-it Canadian Financial Institutions Analyze Feasibility of Central Bank-Issued Digital Currencies https://cointelegraph.com/news/canadian-financial-institutions-analyze-feasibility-of-central-bank-issued-digital-currencies Bank of America Wins Patent for Crypto Exchange System https://www.coindesk.com/bank-of-america-outlines-cryptocurrency-exchange-system-in-patent-award/ North Korea may be making a fortune from bitcoin mania http://money.cnn.com/2017/12/12/technology/north-korea-bitcoin-hoard/index.html 'We are about to see massive disruptions': IMF's Lagarde says it's time to get serious about digital currency https://www.cnbc.com/2017/10/13/bitcoin-get-serious-about-digital-currency-imf-christine-lagarde-says.html In ancient Greek and Egyptian mythology, the phoenix is a mythical bird associated with the Egyptian sun god Ra and the Greek god Phoibos Apollo (Apollyon or Abaddon in Hebrew). It is a symbol of death and resurrection. Lately, the rising of the Phoenix ritual is being displayed all around us from ceremonies to TV shows, music albums and even some strange incidents around the world. The question: Why? According to Manly P. Hall (°33 Freemason) the Phoenix will rise again: The time will come when the secret wisdom shall again be the dominating religious and philosophical urge of the world. The day is at hand when the doom of dogma shall be sounded. The great theological Tower of Babel, with its confusion of tongues, was built of bricks of mud and the mortar of slime. Out of the cold ashes of lifeless creeds, however, shall rise phoenix like the ancient Mysteries.” (Manly P. Hall, The Secret Teachings of All Ages, 2003 Edition, original text published in 1928) The inhabitants of the earth whose names have not been written in the book of life from the creation of the world will be astonished when they see the beast, because he once was, now is not, and yet will come.” (Revelations 17:8) RFID, Blockchain, AI, Bitcoin - Mark of the Beast https://youtu.be/W7nt5FynDw8 One World Currency - China Creating Blockchain Currency https://youtu.be/U_t7gWT6Tx4 One World Religion Is Almost Here - Who's Driving It? https://youtu.be/mCwZ4Fkwqx8 How To Break Spiritual Strongholds - Full Armor of God https://youtu.be/dPkONf3pJbg New videos are posted daily. Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/c/ShakingMyHeadProductions /////// Saved Sober Awake - http://savedsoberawake.com/ Cell Towers - 5G - The Truth Will Shock You! - https://youtu.be/Ua1QzJi6Cwc Saturnalia Nimrod Tammuz Saturn Worship - https://youtu.be/AlynY3KC-hQ RFID, Blockchain, AI, Bitcoin - The Truth Will Shock You! - https://youtu.be/W7nt5FynDw8 The First Church of Artificial Intelligence - https://youtu.be/Ll1ww996_I0 5G Technology - What You Need To Know! - https://youtu.be/7xd1_gCJNwA
Fashion's toxic threads | The Economist
 
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A single clothes wash can release up to 700,000 microplastic fibres, many of which end up in the ocean. Now some pioneering fashion brands are putting the materials they use under the microscope. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Supported by Woolmark For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 101612 The Economist
Mark Brincat (CTO of The Economist) at GlobalLogic Kyiv
 
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The Economist is a media company that has an impressive 175-year history and looks to the future. Thanks to the digital transformation of its business, The Economist evolved from a XIX and XX century magazine into a contemporary system of media services. Mark Brincat, CTO of The Economist, held a lecture at GlobalLogic and noted that digital reinvention is vital for every successful business.
Views: 167 GlobalLogicUkraine
Germany's Mittelstand | The Economist
 
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As the world gazes admiringly at Germany's economic success, we discover why the country's small and medium-sized companies have performed so well Subscribe NOW to The Economist: http://econ.st/1Fsu2Vj On the outskirts of the sleepy town of Gutersloh in northwest Germany is Miele, a company that's been making kitchen and laundry appliances in the area for over a hundred years. Across the country over ten thousand of its employees produce over a million washing machines and tumble dryers every year. With annual sales of 2.8 billion euros the company now has eight plants across Germany. Miele is one of many small and medium sized German businesses known collectively as the Mittelstand. Firms like these provide the muscle to the country's economic might. Other nations may quake in the face of competition from Asia but not Germany. Its luxury manufacturers sell posh cars to the new Asian rich, and the metal stand makes machine tools and equipment that Chinese firms use to make consumer goods. But what makes the Mittelstand so successful? In recent years politicians have done a lot to help. In reforming the country's labour market successive governments have been ahead of the curve but so have Mittelstand companies themselves - constantly innovating, adapting, and evolving. By avoiding debt, specializing in niche markets, developing product related services, and investing in vocational training, Germany's small and medium-sized companies have remained at the cutting edge of global manufacturing Miele is still family-owned. Marcus Miele whose great-grandfather Karl co-founded the company in 1899 is one of its managing directors. Like many Mittelstand businessman he refuses to saddle the company with debt even if it means slower growth. Just a few miles down the road is Beckhoff Automation another successful family-owned company. It started out as an electrical installation shop in the 1950s and has since turned itself into a multi-million euro company - selling specialized industrial computers to customers all over the world. And Beckhoff doesn't just design its products here it also makes them. Visit one of its production lines and you're confronted with a scene you'd usually expect to see in China or Taiwan. This is where it makes the motherboards for its computers. By its refusal to outsource jobs like these Beckhoff maintain strict control over the quality of its products - but it also means the company can respond quickly to an increase in demand and that demand often comes from other German companies. Hans Beckhoff inherited the business from his father and has overseen the company's rapid growth over the past thirty years. He says that by sticking together, Mittelstand firms have created a value-added chain. In other European countries there are plenty of University graduates and unskilled workers but not much in between. In Germany vocational training is much better. Skilled blue-collar workers are the heart and soul of the Mittelstand. Not only trained to operate the machines but also to understand how they work. By offering academic apprenticeships a dual system where University students spend as much time working as studying firms like Miele play a crucial role in keeping Germany's unemployment levels low. The mittelstand's success has attracted admiring glances from the rest of Europe but it's built on foundations that may be hard to copy - from Germany's family traditions to its skilled workers. Like Silicon Valley, the mittelstand remains one of a kind Get more The Economist Follow us: https://twitter.com/TheEconomist Like us: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist View photos: https://instagram.com/theeconomist/ The Economist videos give authoritative insight and opinion on international news, politics, business, finance, science, technology and the connections between them.
Views: 86674 The Economist
Why are women paid less than men? | The Economist
 
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The gender pay gap is not caused by women earning less than men for the same job. It is largely because women choose different careers and suffer a “motherhood penalty”’. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2Bnu9E9 Women who work full-time, still earn 15% less than men. But that's not because they are paid less for the same jobs. It's because they're in different jobs. Women are in less senior jobs. In Britain, France and Germany, 80-90% of executive jobs are held by men. Women also tend to choose different occupations. In America over 80% of teachers, nurses, secretaries, and health workers are female and these jobs tend to be lower paid. Primary school teachers in the West earn nearly 20% less than the average graduate job. Nurses earn less than police officers. Cleaners less than caretakers. Women are as ambitious as men. They earn the majority of university degrees. In America, they now ask for promotions as often as men. But it's the price women pay for motherhood that holds them back. In Britain, 70% of mothers reduced their working hours or switched to a less demanding job compared with 11% of fathers. In Australia it's 56% of mothers and 19% of fathers, while in France 55% of mothers scaled back compared to 13% of fathers. When an American women goes back to work her salary is on average lower than it would have been if she hadn't had a child. The race for gender equality is far from over. As more children choose non-traditional careers and men do more childcare, fewer working women will be held back. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2Bq9Q9n Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2Bqvr16 Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2Bqvqdy Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2BmFapk Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2BnC9VK
Views: 146305 The Economist
What could threaten Amazon’s empire? | The Economist
 
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Amazon accounts for more than half of every dollar spent online in America and is the world's leading provider of cloud computing. But can the company avoid the attention of the regulators? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 This week we put Amazon on the cover. Amazon is a remarkable company but what's extraordinary about it is the scale of its ambitions. Its shareholders expect it to grow faster for longer than any big company in modern business history and we asked whether it can do so. More than half of every new online dollar that's spent in America goes to Amazon. It's already the world's biggest cloud computing firm; it's set to spend more on TV investments than HBO, a big cable channel, next year. Amazon's success is built on two things in particular. One is its willingness to think about the long term - in an era when chief executives complain about the pressure to deliver results on a quarterly basis, Jeff Bezos, Amazon's founder and chief executive, thinks in terms of years and decades. It's expressly been part of its business model to take the cash that it earns and to invest it in order to take advantage of what it calls network effect, the idea is that more users you attract to its e-commerce site the more attractive it is to other retailers and therefore the more users come on to the site. Its bet is that if you invest hard for the long term the rewards will be enormous. The other thing that distinguishes Amazon is the span of its activities. It's no longer right to think about Amazon as a retailer. In its filings it lists as competitors everyone from media companies to food manufacturers, social networks to logistics firms. It is a conglomerate that spreads across all commerce. The amazing thing about Amazon is that it could well achieve investors expectations for it, but if it does then it could run into a problem, and that problem is the regulators. At the moment antitrust enforcers don't particularly worry about Amazon. It's not even the biggest retailer in America, it's most mature market. But if it gets as big as shareholders expect it to then they may start to look at it and not just because of antitrust rules but also because it will become a kind of utility for commerce. Lots of competitors will rely on it for services. Renting warehouses, for example, paying for goods, and that dependence on Amazon could be a reason for the government to look at it more closely and with that it's business maybe threatened. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films every day of the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 64400 The Economist
Italian, Agnelli family buys 43% of The Economist
 
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British company, Pearson has sold its 50 percent stake in the company that owns The Economist magazine to the group's other shareholders for about 730 million dollars. The move comes a month after the education company sold the Financial Times to Japan's Nikkei newspaper for 1.3 billion dollars. Pearson's stake is being bought, in part, by Italian company Exor-the holding company of the Agnelli family, founders of Italian carmaker Fiat.
Views: 1881 CGTN Africa
REALIST NEWS - Treasury Secretary's Statement and the Cover of Economist Magazine Connection
 
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http://www.jmbullion.com (Recommended for Silver and Gold Purchases.) http://www.realistnews.net
Views: 6459 jsnip4
An economist walks into a bar | Robert Litan | TEDxKC
 
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This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Litan's talk explores the surprising role economists have played in the development of the internet economy -- and quite possibly your love life. As an economist and attorney, Litan has had nearly four decades of experience in the worlds of the law, economic research and policy, and as an executive in the private, public and government sectors. He has directed economic research at three major organizations – The Brookings Institution, The Kauffman Foundation and Bloomberg Government – and authored or co-authored 27 books on a variety of economic topics. His most recent book, “The Trillion Dollar Economists,” will be published by Wiley Press this September. Litan currently is a non-resident senior fellow at Brookings; counsel to Korein Tillery, a law firm based in St. Louis and Chicago specializing in large case litigation; chief economist at Main Street Genome, a D.C.-based startup providing financial analytics to small businesses; and a regular contributor to the Think Tank blog published by The Wall Street Journal. About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 292152 TEDx Talks
China: facial recognition and state control | The Economist
 
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China is the world leader in facial recognition technology. Discover how the country is using it to develop a vast hyper-surveillance system able to monitor and target its ethnic minorities, including the Muslim Uighur population. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Improving lives, increasing connectivity across the world, that's the great promise offered by data-driven technology - but in China it also promises greater state control and abuse of power. This is the next groundbreaking development in data-driven technology, facial recognition. And in China you can already withdraw cash, check in at airports, and pay for goods using just your face. The country is the world's leader in the use of this emerging technology, and China's many artificial intelligence startups are determined to keep it that way in the future. Companies like Yitu. Yitu is creating the building blocks for a smart city of the future, where facial recognition is part of everyday life. This could even extend to detecting what people are thinking. But the Chinese government has plans to use this new biometric technology to cement its authoritarian rule. The country has ambitious plans to develop a vast national surveillance system based on facial recognition. It'll be used to monitor it's 1.4 billion citizens in unprecedented ways. With the capability of tracking everything from their emotions to their sexuality. The primary means will be a vast network of CCTV cameras. 170 million are already in place and an estimated 400 million new ones will be installed over the next three years. The authorities insist this program will allow them to improve security for citizens, and if you have nothing to hide you have nothing to fear. But not everyone is convinced. Hong Zhenkuai is a former magazine editor who was ousted by the government. He feels like he's under constant surveillance. Already the authorities are using facial recognition to name and shame citizens, even for minor offenses like jaywalking. In Beijing they're using the technology to prevent people stealing rolls of loo paper from public toilets, and across China police officers are now trialing sunglasses and body cameras loaded with facial and gesture recognition technology - it's helping them to identify wanted suspects in real-time. What worries some people here is that as the technology develops, so too does the capacity for it to be abused. Some of those most at risk in this hyper surveillance future are the ethnic minorities in China. In Xinjiang province, the Chinese government is wary of the separatist threat posed by the Muslim Uighur population. According to local NGOs, an estimated 1 million Uighurs are being detained indefinitely in secretive internment camps, where some are being subject to abuse. It's been called the largest mass incarceration of a minority population in the world today. The authorities are using facial recognition cameras to scan people's faces before they enter markets. The system alerts authorities if targeted individuals stray 300 meters beyond their home. In the future the government plans to aggregate even more data and build a predictive policing program that imposes even tighter controls here. Without checks and balances, China will keep finding new ways to violate the human rights of its citizens. What's already happening in Xinjiang is a warning the rest of the world must heed. What are the forces shaping how people live and work and how power is wielded in the modern age? NOW AND NEXT reveals the pressures, the plans and the likely tipping points for enduring global change. Understand what is really transforming the world today – and discover what may lie in store tomorrow. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 276601 The Economist
What will be the biggest stories of 2019? | Part Two | The Economist
 
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Augmented-reality surgery, moon landings and a battle for the soul of Europe will be major talking points in the year ahead. But what else will make our countdown for the top ten stories for 2019? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy What will be the biggest stories of the year ahead? 00:35 - 5 - Augmented-reality surgery 2019 will bring a whole new reality for some patients going under the knife, as surgeons use augmented reality headsets to help carry out operations. Doctors at St Mary's Hospital in London are pioneering the use of AR to improve skin graft surgery. It's hoped this technology will make surgery faster and safer for patients. Multiple images from CT scans are combined to make a 3D hologram which is superimposed onto the surgeons real world view. The AR headsets were developed from the technology used in a Microsoft games console but they now have life-saving applications. 02:30 - 4 Japan tackles tourism In September sports fans will turn their eyes to Japan as it hosts the Rugby World Cup. The tournament will be more than just a warm-up for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics it's central to a plan to transform the country's economy. The government hopes to boost the number of tourists to 40 million a year by 2020 - 25 percent more than in 2017. Currently around 85 percent of visitors to Japan are from Asia but it is now attracting more Western visitors with far more spending power. In preparation for this boom a taxi company in Tokyo has organized a competition to test drivers English. The winner early started learning English four years ago and he's seen a steady rise in foreign customers. The Japanese government also wants more foreigners to stay in the country. With famously low immigration rates and almost a third of citizens aged over 65, Japan is suffering from a dire labor shortage but legislation has been passed that will allow three hundred and forty-five thousand foreign workers in over the next seven years. But with the Japanese population shrinking by nearly four hundred thousand a year the country may need to welcome even more people from the rest of the world. 05:06 Testing Trump 2019 is set to be US president Donald Trump's most testing year yet when Democrats assume control of the House of Representatives and he comes under more scrutiny. Mr. Trump came to power promising to rid Washington DC of corruption and vested interests. But this could be the year the swamp really makes the president sweat. Top of the list for some Democrats is publishing the president's tax returns. But it won't just be his financial affairs under the spotlight - the real pressure on Mr. Trump in 2019 could come from the Muller investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. If the investigation supports serious allegations against the president then 2019 could be the year that the Democrats begin impeachment proceedings. But don't expect the Republican majority in the Senate to convict him or any charges to even make a dent in Mr. Trump's core support across the country So for Mr. Trump's political opponents the real focus in 2019 is likely to be on who they choose to run against him at the next presidential election. 07:46 - 2 Moon rush On the 20th of July the world will remember the moment 50 years ago when Neil Armstrong first set foot on the moon. In 2019 there will be new entrants in the race to return to the moon. Israeli nonprofit organizations space il hopes it's Lander will be the first lunar expedition funded by private enterprise and other companies like Astrobotic in the US are also planning to get in on the action soon. Not to be outdone China's Lunar Lander should also touchdown in 2019, making it the first craft to land on the far side of the Moon - But there is more than just prestige at stake and it will no longer just be men taking giant leaps. 10:05 - 1 Battle for Europe The biggest story of 2019 won't be, as some might think, the UK's protracted divorce from the European Union. In 2019 a bigger broader upheaval is set to unfold across the continent ahead of the European parliamentary elections. Populist parties have shaken the traditional political order across the continent and are hoping to win more power than ever in the 2019 vote. It raises the multi-billion euro question what will all this mean for the EU's future. Some of its supporters hope that populist forces could ultimately push the EU into reforms which will save it and the continents prosperity. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 515463 The Economist
Where to invest in 2019? | The Economist
 
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Where should you look to invest in 2019? Our capital-markets editor John O'Sullivan suggests the best strategy for the year ahead. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 165318 The Economist
Saudi Arabia: open for tourists | The Economist
 
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Saudi Arabia is spending half-a-trillion dollars on coastal resorts and an entertainment complex to try and attract more tourists. It's part of the crown prince's plan to diversify the country's economy away from oil. Will it work? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: https://econ.st/2v5Oqtz Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://econ.st/2v5g0XV Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://econ.st/2v5Os4F Follow us on Instagram: https://econ.st/2v3KXLZ Follow us on Medium: https://econ.st/2v1nLOm
Views: 481329 The Economist
The Economist Magazine Audio Edition 29-04-2017_PART 2
 
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Now instead of reading, you can enjoy listening to the every story in The Economist magazine..
The music industry and the digital revolution
 
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The music industry has come a long way since Radiohead allowed fans to pay what they wanted for an album. But there is still plenty of digital disruption going on. Tech companies such as Kobalt provide an alternative route for musicians to find fans and manage their money—without having to rely on a record deal. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 The Disrupters is an original series exploring how major industries—from music and cars to hospitality—are currently being disrupted by the latest wave of digital innovation. As well as enjoying privileged access into the world biggest tech start ups we show how industry giants respond when faced with such tech-driven innovation. Do they adapt—or die? Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Read our Tumblr: http://theeconomist.tumblr.com/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6
Views: 197227 The Economist
Mysterious digital currency announced by the economist magazine from 1988 finally revealed
 
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Extract from the economist magazine from 1988: "THIRTY years from now, Americans, Japanese, Europeans, and people in many other rich countries, and some relatively poor ones will probably be paying for their shopping with the same currency. Prices will be quoted not in dollars, yen or D-marks but in, let’s say, the phoenix. The phoenix will be favored by companies and shoppers because it will be more convenient than today’s national currencies, which by then will seem a quaint cause of much disruption to economic life in the last twentieth century. Get Ready for the Phoenix - January 9, 1988, Vol. 306, pp 9-10" https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-07-09/economist-get-ready-world-currency-2018 Beat: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r92nIjtjr_Y ecredits: https://ecredits.com Instagram: https://instagram.com/thepeoplescurrency?igshid=btsgz6kgbyew
Views: 1925 Tyler Durden
Pearson says sells its share of The Economist Group
 
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British publishing company Pearson on Aug. 12 said it had agreed to sell its 50-percent stake in The Economist Group, owner of prestigious magazine The Economist. The share is being sold for 469 million ($730 million, 663 million euros), split between The Economist Group itself and Italian investment firm Exor, which is controlled by the Agnelli family, Pearson said in a statement. “Exor has agreed to purchase 27.8 percent of The Economist Group’s ordinary shares for consideration of 227.5 million and all of the B special shares for consideration of 59.5 million from Pearson,” the statement said. “Pearson’s remaining ordinary shares will be repurchased by The Economist Group for a total consideration of 182 million.” The sale forms part of major restructuring at Pearson, which wants to focus solely on its education publishing business. It last month announced plans to sell The Economist Group, which includes also Economist.com and the Economist Intelligence Unit, as it revealed a deal to sell the Financial Times newspaper to Japanese digital media group Nikkei. “Pearson is now 100 percent focused on our global education strategy,” its chief executive John Fallon said in the statement. “The world of education is changing rapidly and we see great opportunity to grow our business through increasing access to high quality learning globally.” Pearson described The Economist as “one of the world’s leading weekly business and current affairs publications with a circulation of around 1.6 million.”
Views: 18 Mindreader
How to fuel the future | The Economist
 
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America, under President Donald Trump, is securing its “energy independence” with oil and gas. But unlike fossil fuels, renewables will not increase global warming —and China is moving fast. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Oil moves the world around and creates powerful countries. Oil is such a vital commodity that it provoked wars throughout the 20th century. The few countries that produce it, try to keep control of it to ensure its riches stay at home. Those who do not have it, strive to get it. In the 1930s Saudi Arabia was one of the poorest countries in the world but the discovery of oil transformed it and Saudi Arabia has amassed $515.6 billion in sovereign wealth funds. It has become the linchpin of a powerful cartel that sometimes rations oil to push up prices. The United States is now the biggest producer of oil and gas owing to its shale revolution. It has tapped abundant reserves through fracking - a technology that uses high-pressure water and sand to fracture rock deep below the ground to extract hydrocarbons. This shale revolution has helped the United States become less dependent on oil imported from Saudi Arabia, Venezuela, Iraq, and other OPEC countries. More oil and gas on global markets has also benefited the world's energy consumers by pushing down costs. Oil still remains the primary fuel, supplying almost 1/3 of the world's energy but its heyday may soon be over, despite growing demand. By 2040 the world's global energy use is set to increase by 30 percent. That energy must be much cleaner if the world wants to prevent catastrophic global warming. In the past coal and gas were less expensive than renewable technology but their costs have come down dramatically. There is now a race among some nations to create more efficient renewable technologies to reduce pollution and be more energy self-sufficient. China is the world's largest consumer of coal and the second largest of oil but it also now leads the world in clean energy. one third of the world's new wind power and solar panels is installed in China, and it sells more electric cars than any other country. The quest for energy self-sufficiency is a big motivation for many countries. China is moving fast, and America under President Donald Trump, is securing its energy independence with oil and gas. But unlike oil and gas renewables will not increase global warming. The long term transition to clean energy will throw up new global challenges. It will create tensions in unstable parts of the Middle East as oil revenue starts to dry up. Another challenge is that wind and sun are intermittent. renewables may require vast shared electricity grids spanning boarders to make them more efficient. To stop global warming the world needs a huge collaboration over our shared energy future. If we fail, wars over scarce resources could be even worse in the 21st century than in the 20th. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 78894 The Economist
Economic Systems and Macroeconomics: Crash Course Economics #3
 
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In which Jacob Clifford and Adriene Hill teach you about Economic Systems and Macroeconomics. So, economics is basically about choices. We'll look at some of the broadest economic choices when we talk about the difference between planned economies and market economies. We'll get into communism, socialism, command economies, and capitalism. We'll look at how countries choose the kind of system they're going to use (spoiler alert: many end up with mixed economies). We'll also look into how individuals make economic choices. Crash Course is now on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Jan Schmid, Anna-Ester Volozh, Robert Kunz, Jason A Saslow, Christian Ludvigsen, Chris Peters, Brad Wardell, Beatrice Jin, Roger C. Rocha, Eric Knight, Jessica Simmons, Jeffrey Thompson, Elliot Beter, Today I Found Out, James Craver, Ian Dundore, Jessica Wode, SR Foxley, Sandra Aft, Jacob Ash, Steve Marshall TO: Everyone FROM: Martin To gild refined gold is just silly. TO: Dana FROM: Cameron Still holding out. We're going to make it! Thank you so much to all of our awesome supporters for their contributions to help make Crash Course possible and freely available for everyone forever: Raymond Cason, Marcel Pogorzelski, Cowgirlgem, Chua Chen Wei, Catherine Emond, Victoria Uney, Robin Uney, Damian Shaw, Sverre Rabbelier Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1681020 CrashCourse
Why is vanilla so expensive? | The Economist
 
05:20
In recent years, natural vanilla has sometimes been more expensive than silver by weight. Vanilla farmers in Madagascar are cashing in—but violence, theft and volatile markets are threatening their prospects. Read more here: https://econ.st/2W5qwNB Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy From ice cream to cakes and even perfume, vanilla is the go-to flavour the world over. In recent years the price of natural vanilla has shot up. At one point it was more expensive than silver by weight. 80% of the world’s vanilla is grown in the perfectly suited climate of the north-east region of Madagascar. It’s the country’s primary export crop. For the farmers, like Beni Odon, life is far sweeter when the vanilla price is high. In 2014 vanilla was $80 a kilo. Three years later it was $600. Today it’s around $500. The price rise is due in part to global demand. The trend of eating naturally means that food companies have shunned synthetic flavouring in favour of the real deal. Beni and the other farmers are cashing in. But things can change very quickly. Price fluctuations affect producers of agricultural commodities everywhere but vanilla is particularly volatile. In just a few weeks the price can jump, or plummet, by over 20% Liberalisation is one reason for such movements. The Malagasy government once regulated the vanilla industry and its price. But now the price is negotiated at the point of sale which makes for a freer market but a more volatile one. It’s also a tiny industry. A single cyclone can knock out the entire crop within Madagascar. It’s also a difficult and delicate crop to grow. The growers have to contend with another problem. Thieves are targeting the vanilla crops. Some farmers have resorted to harvesting the beans before they’re ripe but this produces a poorer quality vanilla and ultimately pushes down the price. The combination of deteriorating quality and high prices is having an effect. The vanilla price bubble may burst. Big buyers that provide vanilla for the likes of Häagen-Dazs and Ben & Jerry’s are now working directly with farmers in a bid to gain greater control over quality. Other companies have started to look elsewhere for their natural vanilla. Indonesia, Uganda and even the Netherlands are growing the crop. For a century Madagascar has enjoyed a near-monopoly on vanilla. But this industry may be in line for a radical overhaul. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 153333 The Economist
Inside A Warehouse Where Thousands Of Robots Pack Groceries
 
03:21
Ocado's new warehouse has thousands of robots zooming around a grid system to pack groceries. The thousands of robots can process 65,000 orders every week. They communicate on a 4G network to avoid bumping into each other. Is this the future of retail? See more from Ocado: https://www.ocado.com/ Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 1657861 Tech Insider
What is Inflation?
 
08:01
Economists constantly refer to inflation and tend to suggest it is a Very Bad Thing. But why exactly, where does it come from and what could one do to tame it? Please subscribe here: http://tinyurl.com/o28mut7 If you like our films take a look at our shop (we ship worldwide): http://www.theschooloflife.com/shop/all/ Brought to you by http://www.theschooloflife.com Produced in collaboration with Vale Productions http://www.valeproductions.co.uk Music Lanquidity by http://www.purple-planet.com #TheSchoolOfLife
Views: 779077 The School of Life
Doctor vs Engineer vs Business | Deciding on a Career
 
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Deciding between a career in medicine, engineering, and business? We'll go over the main pros and cons of each, and help you determine which career path is right for you. Vlog channel: https://youtube.com/lifeofasurgeon I'm not sure about you - I personally did NOT always know that I wanted to be a doctor. In fact, I was deciding between computer science and medicine even in college. I go over how I chose medicine in this video: https://youtu.be/Gyqu5AER7gg Once in medical school, I actually found myself combining all three disciplines in an interdisciplinary biomedical incubator called Blue LINC, which was modeled after Stanfords' Biodesign. In it, we combine students from engineering, business, and medicine, and help these interdisciplinary teams create healthcare startups. =============== Support the channel and become a Patron! Visit https://patreon.com/medschoolinsiders Connect with me! WEBSITE: https://medschoolinsiders.com TWITTER: https://twitter.com/MedInsiders FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/medschoolinsiders INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/medschoolinsiders AMAZON STORE: https://www.amazon.com/shop/medschoolinsiders =============== Disclaimer: Content of this video is my opinion and does not constitute medical advice. The content and associated links provide general information for general educational purposes only. Use of this information is strictly at your own risk. Kevin Jubbal, M.D. and Med School Insiders LLC will not assume any liability for direct or indirect losses or damages that may result from the use of information contained in this video including but not limited to economic loss, injury, illness or death.
Views: 229040 Med School Insiders
The real truth about the 2008 financial crisis | Brian S. Wesbury | TEDxCountyLineRoad
 
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This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. The Great Economic Myth of 2008, challenging the accounting to accounting principal. Brian Wesbury is Chief Economist at First Trust Advisors L.P., a financial services firm based in Wheaton, Illinois. Mr. Wesbury has been a member of the Academic Advisory Council of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago since 1999. In 2012, he was named a Fellow of the George W. Bush Presidential Center in Dallas, TX where he works closely with its 4%-Growth Project. His writing appears in various magazines, newspapers and blogs, and he appears regularly on Fox, Bloomberg, CNBCand BNN Canada TV. In 1995 and 1996, he served as Chief Economist for the Joint Economic Committee of the U.S. Congress. The Wall Street Journal ranked Mr. Wesbury the nation’s #1 U.S. economic forecaster in 2001, and USA Today ranked him as one of the nation’s top 10 forecasters in 2004. Mr. Wesbury began his career in 1982 at the Harris Bank in Chicago. Former positions include Vice President and Economist for the Chicago Corporation and Senior Vice President and Chief Economist for Griffin, Kubik, Stephens, & Thompson. Mr. Wesbury received an M.B.A. from Northwestern University’s Kellogg Graduate School of Management, and a B.A. in Economics from the University of Montana. McGraw-Hill published his first book, The New Era of Wealth, in October 1999. His most recent book, It’s Not As Bad As You Think, was published in November 2009 by John Wiley & Sons. In 2011, Mr. Wesbury received the University of Montana’s Distinguished Alumni Award. This award honors outstanding alumni who have “brought honor to the University, the state or the nation.” There have been 267 recipients of this award out of a potential pool of 91,000 graduates. About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 2112040 TEDx Talks
The future of fashion | The Economist
 
02:24
The fashion industry is on the verge of a tech revolution. Clothes of tomorrow could be designed, fitted and sold to us by technology alone. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy From Gucci to Chanel, Topshop to Primark - Clothes industry heavyweights rely on fashion forecasters for next season's new look. But advancements in artificial intelligence are about to turn their art into a science. Cognitive computing is now able to identify patterns previously inaccessible to humans. It can simultaneously analyse vast amounts of global data - from social media buzz to political polls - making it possible to accurately spot what's hot and what's not. WGSN, the world's biggest fashion forecaster. now uses AI alongside more traditional methods. A move that could reduce forecasting errors by up to 50%. Trend-spotting mistakes can have far-reaching consequences. H&M recently confessed to a $4.3 billion unsold stock mountain. Industry waste costs both profits and reputation. Technology could make the fashion industry more sustainable. By using machine learning, an AI technique, to match supply with demand unnecessary manufacturing could be limited and fashions environmental footprint reduced. Online retailers are cottoning on. In the next two years 75% of fashion retailers plan to invest in AI. But keeping up with tech giants is going to be tough. Amazon is now developing what's believed to be the world's first AI fashion designer. It plans to use an algorithm that designs clothes by analyzing images and copying popular styles - using them to build completely new designs. This technological makeover could hold huge benefits especially for those who like to shop online. A Japanese company has unveiled the Zozo, a body measurement suit that will ensure the clothes you order fits you perfectly. All meaning our future wardrobes could contain clothes designed for us and sold to us by technology alone. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 47379 The Economist
How could veganism change the world? | The Economist
 
06:30
Interest in vegan food and its associated health benefits has been booming across the rich world. A global retreat from meat could have a far-reaching environmental impact. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy By 2050 the world's population could approach 10 billion - and around 60% more food could be needed to feed everyone. The environmental impacts of the food system are daunting its responsible for about a quarter of all greenhouse gas emissions and uses about 70% of all freshwater resources, and it occupies about 40% of the Earth's land surface. Food rated emissions could increase to 50 percent by 2050 and fill up the total emissions budget that we have in order to avoid dangerous levels of climate change. Interest in vegan food has been booming across the rich world. A major study has put the diet to the test - analyzing an imagined scenario in which the world goes vegan by 2050. If everybody went vegan by 2050 we estimated that food-related greenhouse gas emissions could be reduced by 3/4. Cows are the biggest emission contributors. Bugs in their digestive system produce methane and deforestation for their pasture releases carbon dioxide - these gases warm the planet. If cows were a country, they'd be the third largest greenhouse gas emitter. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 520981 The Economist
Oil and gas companies are facing major technological disruption
 
14:49
Pressure to reduce carbon emissions is putting the future of fossil fuel giants in jeopardy. Their survival plans involve carbon storage and floating wind farms. Meanwhile, one small German village is showing how large companies aren't always essential. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Over 80% of the world's energy needs are provided by coal, oil and gas. Although technologies to extract fossil fuels may have changed over the decades, the core products themselves have never been challenged. Until now. Pressure to reduce carbon emissions is putting the future of fossil fuel giants in jeopardy. Encouraging the growth of alternative methods to generate and distribute power. In just eight years, the value of the world's biggest power companies has halved. Leaving industry giants scrambling to redefine their role in this new energy world. Across the world, old industries are facing disruption on an unprecedented scale. The pressure to adapt has never been greater. Known as the Paris Accord, 195 countries agreed to a legally binding climate deal to reduce carbon emissions. This 5 trillion dollar industry may be facing a seismic shift but that doesn't mean it's ready to ditch the dirty fossil fuels that made it rich. Instead, many companies are banking on new methods to clean up an old process. Norwegian oil and gas giant, Statoil, struck it rich in the North Sea in the late 1960s. Over four decades later, at its Sleipner gas rig, the company is attempting to make fossil fuel production cleaner. Statoil's business still relies on the harmful burning of fossil fuels by its customers but at least the company is trying to reduce its own carbon footprint. It's transformed some of its offshore rigs with technology that enables engineers to separate the carbon dioxide and pump it underground. Statoil's Sleipner gas rig is the world's first offshore carbon capture storage plant. Each year, Statoil stores 1 million tonnes of CO2 making extraction less carbon intensive. They believe that prioritising gas over more harmful fossil fuels will further reduce global warming and keep them relevant for decades to come. Wind and solar are cleaner but depend on subsidies. To take on the consistency of fossil fuels they face a huge challenge - The unpredictable weather. In Bavaria, a tiny village has used those subsidies to take up the challenge. This community believes it's found a way to produce a steady energy supply just from renewable sources, raising the real prospect of a future free from fossil fuels. Norbert and Kristina Bechteler's family farm has been providing the local community with dairy products for over 200 years but they now have a new income from solar energy. Producing your own energy with solar panels isn't revolutionary but in this village, they're combining solar with other renewables in an attempt to achieve the Holy Grail of a steady energy supply. And they're prepared to use anything to do it. The Deputy Mayor has helped drive the village's pioneering efforts to make renewable energy a realistic option. There's one renewable that never disappears as it can be sourced from the decay of virtually any organic matter and it's called biogas. Of the four biogas plants in the village, Farmer Einsiedler runs the largest. Combining these different sources has been so successful the village now generates five times more energy than it needs. But that is just part of the challenge of turning renewables into a credible energy supply. The Disrupters is an original series exploring how major industries – from music and cars to hospitality – are currently being disrupted by the latest wave of digital innovation. As well as enjoying privileged access into the world biggest tech start ups we show how industry giants respond when faced with such tech-driven innovation - do they adapt - or die? Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Read our Tumblr: http://theeconomist.tumblr.com/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6
Views: 718652 The Economist
Liberalization, Privatization and Globalization - How Indian economy was saved by Dr Manmohan Singh
 
27:01
#StudyIQ Pendrive Courses for Various Govt. Exams, Click here http://bit.ly/2QcdLOd to know in detail OR Call 95-8004-8004 UPSC/CSE - This is our Flagship & Most Selling Course. This course covered Length & Breadth of UPSC vast syllabus and made by Elite & Very best faculties from all over India with StudyIQ Trust. Click here http://bit.ly/2QbHfM7 to watch Demo Videos, Course Content, Authors, Etc. SSC & Bank - This is our oldest Course, made by Founders of StudyIQ. 1000+ videos so far and new videos added every week. Click here http://bit.ly/2QaG3ZE to know more. UPSC Optionals - We have covered almost all major UPSC Optionals. Click here http://bit.ly/2QqTKUU to find yours State Exams PSCs - Currently we have 18 States covered, More to come, Choose your state. Click http://bit.ly/2Qgv6G0 to watch demo videos, know about authors and all. Defense Exams - CDS, NDA, CAPF, SSB, AFCAT, Airforce. Click here http://bit.ly/2zT8MbP to get into the Army, Navy or Airforce SSC JE Exams - Civil, Mechanical, Electrical, Electronics. Click here http://bit.ly/2G8eDQ0 to know more RBI Grade B - Grade B is the most popular Job after IAS. This course made by well-experienced faculties of Study IQ. Click here http://bit.ly/2DAtlwm to watch demo videos, Authors, Course content. NTA NET - Start your preparation for UGC(NTA) NET prestigious exam. We have courses for both Paper 1 & 2. Click here http://bit.ly/2HnhFNQ to check UPSC Prelim Test Series - Our flagship test series for UPSC Prelims. More than 60% Sucess rate in 2018. Click here http://bit.ly/2Ea4Rtx to enroll right now DMRC Exams - Courses for Delhi Metro Technical & Non-Technical Exams. Click here http://bit.ly/2Q4cFS8 to know more Insurance Exams - LIC, NICL, and other insurance exams. Click here http://bit.ly/2VpbXjE to know more Law Exams - Find courses for Undergraduate and Judiciary Exams. Click here http://bit.ly/2Jk4G31 to check Railway Jobs - More than 1.5 Lac jobs to come this year. Start your preparation with us for Tech or Non-Tech posts. Click here http://bit.ly/2Ti5NB6 to check the available courses Teaching Jobs - CTET, DSSSB. Click here http://bit.ly/30oBgWP to know more NABARD Grade A - https://goo.gl/C6CzAL Have a doubt? Click here http://bit.ly/2qWhdOI to start instant Chat with our Sale team or you can #Call_9580048004 _ Click here http://bit.ly/2V5GN0h to Sponsor Study IQ UPSCIQ Magazine - http://bit.ly/2DH1ZWq || Bank IQ Magazine - http://bit.ly/2QxyNmJ Daily Current Affairs - http://bit.ly/2VDIuT0 Follow us on Instagram - http://bit.ly/2K0uXEH Download All Videos PDFs - https://goo.gl/X8UMwF || Join StudyIQ on Telegram - https://goo.gl/xBR3g8 Monthly Current Affairs - http://bit.ly/2UAXktE Topic Wise Current Affairs - http://bit.ly/2VHxiZw Free PDFs - https://goo.gl/cJufZc || Free Quiz - https://goo.gl/wCxZsy || Free Video Courses - https://goo.gl/jtMKP9" Follow us on Facebook - https://goo.gl/iAhPDJ Telegram - https://t.me/Studyiqeducation The Hindu Editorial Analysis - https://goo.gl/vmvHjG Current Affairs by Dr Gaurav Garg - https://goo.gl/bqfkXe UPSC/IAS Burning Issues analysis- https://goo.gl/2NG7vP World History for UPSC - https://goo.gl/J7DLXv Indian History - https://goo.gl/kVwB79 Follow us on Facebook - https://goo.gl/iAhPDJ Follow Dr Gaurav Garg on Facebook - https://goo.gl/xqLaQm UPSC/IAS past papers questions - https://goo.gl/F5gyWH SSC CGL + IBPS Quantitative tricks - https://goo.gl/C6d9n8 English Vocabulary - https://goo.gl/G9e04H Reasoning tricks for Bank PO + SSC CGL- https://goo.gl/a68WRN Error spotting / Sentence correction https://goo.gl/6RbdjC Static GK complete- https://goo.gl/kB0uAo Complete GK + Current Affairs for all exams- https://goo.gl/MKEoLy World History - UPSC / IAS - https://goo.gl/kwU9jC Learn English for SSC CGL, Bank PO https://goo.gl/MoL2it Science and Technology for UPSC/IAS - https://goo.gl/Jm4h8j Philosophy for UPSC/IAS - https://goo.gl/FH9p3n Yojana Magazine analysis -https://goo.gl/8oK1gy History for SSC CGL + Railways NTPC - https://goo.gl/7939eV
Views: 222699 Study IQ education
The economics of AI
 
15:59
Simple economics suggest that when the cost of something falls, we do more of it. As AI improves, prediction will become so good and so cheap that it will transform business and society. It is no longer a question of if AI will change what you do, but when. Your decision to invest in AI depends on your thesis on when you expect prediction to get good enough to transform your organization. How imminent is the transformation and what will be the economic effect of it?
Views: 797 WithTheEconomist
The climate-change experiment  | The Economist
 
05:21
Climate-change experts are researching ways to cool down the planet using geoengineering. How could spraying chemicals into the stratosphere help counteract global warming? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 What if you discovered a way to cool down the planet? Extreme weather events are becoming more common and more ferocious. As the surface temperature of earth continues to rise, so too will the ferocity of natural disasters. In 2018 scientists will take bold steps to explore a technology that could reverse the effects of climate-change. They’re looking at ways to reflect sunlight back into space and cool down the planet. Insurers say the number of weather-related disasters has quadrupled since 1970. While world leaders are debating and disputing climate-change and the ways in which humans alter their behaviour on earth, some scientists discuss changes to the earth itself. In 2018, they’ll take to the stratosphere to learn what it might take – or cost – to cool the planet directly. Geoengineering is the pioneering science that could well be on everyone’s lips in 2018. The team from Harvard University is the first in the world to test the effects solar geoengineering might have in the stratosphere. The experiments in 2018 won’t impact the climate, but if one day implemented, this controversial intervention could help curb extreme weather events. Solar geoengineering has the potential to save lives, but it also poses unknown risks. And there are fears that merely researching geoengineering might be detrimental to the long-term fight against climate-change. Some environmentalists say that the drive to reduce carbon dioxide emissions could be lost if there’s seen to be a quick fix. And deciding who controls a technology that affects everyone on the planet won’t be easy. Ultimately solar geoengineering could prove a risk not worth taking. But ignoring it now could be even more dangerous. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 82393 The Economist
REALIST NEWS - More info on the Economist Magazine cover
 
20:20
Subscribe to my other channel The Political Gameshow: https://www.youtube.com/c/thepoliticalgameshow http://www.jmbullion.com (Recommended for Silver and Gold Purchases.) http://www.realistnews.net
Views: 8276 jsnip4
Doing business in Hong Kong (Full Episode)
 
24:25
In this episode of The Airport Economist Tim is in Hong Kong, Asia's financial hub and the gateway to China. He get insights on doing deals, setting up shop and how to get into the Chinese market. The Airport Economist is your guide to doing business in the Asian Century. Led by renowned economist Tim Harcourt, we'll be visiting thriving markets all across Asia to find out what the emerging opportunities are for doing business there, how to get your foot in the door, learn from companies who are successfully operating there, as well as discover the local culture. In each episode we'll arm you with all the knowledge and insights you need to take your business international. Visit http://www.theairporteconomist.com/ And connect on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theairporteconomist/ Or twitter: https://twitter.com/airport_ec
Views: 3945 Airport Economist
General Stanley McChrystal on leadership for the company of the future
 
20:52
As old corporate hierarchies melt away and more agile, democratic structures emerge, what will it take to be a successful C Suite leader? What new skills will be required, from a deep understanding of digital technology to the ability to inspire millennials? Will the Imperial CEO be replaced by the Authentic CEO? Is holacracy or some similar decentralised decision making structure the answer? Or is the extent of the need for a new leadership style exaggerated? Speaker: Stanley McChrystal, Senior fellow, Yale Jackson Institute for Global Affairs; former United States Army general, US Government Moderator: Vijay Vaitheeswaran, China business editor, The Economist
Views: 4927 WithTheEconomist
How data transformed the NBA | The Economist
 
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NBA teams are changing the way they play basketball. The Houston Rockets, who boast stars like James Harden, have used data analytics to help them become championship contenders in recent seasons. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Sponsored by DXC Technology. An invisible powerful force is lifting professional basketball to new heights, transforming how this multibillion-dollar sport is played and, crucially how to win. In elite sport the difference between success and failure is often the finest of margins. The Houston Rockets are one of the top teams in NBA basketball. They boast some of the sport's biggest stars, including the NBA's most valuable player in 2018. In the past decade the Rockets have risen from mid-table mediocrity to serious NBA championship contenders. But it's not just big names that have fueled this dramatic ascent - it's big data. The Rockets recent success owes much to their pioneering decision to start crunching data about every aspect of their game - and this is the man responsible. Computer scientist Daryl Morey is the sport's foremost data and statistics guru among NBA bosses. Ten years ago Daryl set out to find that winning formula. The Rockets were one of four NBA teams to install a pioneering video tracking system which mined raw data from games. What they discovered changed the way teams try to win. In the 1990s, long two-point shots from just inside the three-point line were common but Darryl's data analysis showed that statistically these shots provided the worst return. In the 2017-18 season the Rockets made more three-pointers than any other team in NBA history and this was a major reason they won more games than any of their rivals. Professor Rajiv Masheswaran co-founded Second Spectrum. The analytics company gathers and codes a vast range of increasingly granular data for all 30 NBA teams. Cameras now track and record 3D spatial data for every player and ball movement at 25 frames per second. Machine learning technology uses this huge volume of data to produce interactive visualizations allowing teams to analyze the minutiae of their performances and achieve marginal gains on court. There is a particular focus on all important data around player movement and the probability of making a shot. Qualitative data analysis has even changed the type of players that successful teams like the Rockets have players today are on average leaner and more agile. When it comes to recruiting new players from the college draft each season, poring over data on player performance has given the Rockets a winning edge. Basketball has constantly changed but it's about to enter a brave new world where data could be courtside in the hands of coaches, helping to swing a game as it happens. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 222966 The Economist
Welcome to the startup jungle | The Economist
 
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Most new companies fail. What does it take for young entrepreneurs around the world to thrive in a startup hub? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2A1ieeK Over the past two decades start-ups have changed the world. Multi-billion dollar companies like Google, Facebook, and Uber have shown the transformative power of entrepreneurship. Today, innovators dream of their idea becoming the next big thing. But the odds are stacked against them. In America alone, 80% of startups will fail. In startup hubs around the world young entrepreneurs are desperate to prove they have what it takes to succeed. But what does it really take to survive? HoloMe is one of half a million companies to start up in Britain every year. The nations capital is a leading hub of innovation, inspiration, and creative energy. In London, and in cities world wide it's the age of the entrepreneur. Startups are championed by governments who see them as key to building a dynamic economy, but the competition is cut-throat. To succeed, you've got to really believe in your product. The rise of the smartphone has brought a wave of global startup successes and inspired endless possibilities for new products. With the proliferation of digital technology and digital services, it's become easier than ever to set up a business and to gamble everything on having the next big idea. In the first six months of 2017, Venture Capitalists pumped more than £1.1bn into London's tech sector. But only two companies in every 1000 manage to get their hands on those funds. In fast moving startup hubs, adaptability is crucial for any would-be entrepreneur. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2A2nGO8 Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2zZuWdQ Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2A0hDtA Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2zZuXOW Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2zZ8iSZ In start-up hubs around the world, young entrepreneurs are desperate to prove they have what it takes to succeed. But the odds are stacked against them. What does it really take to survive in the hub?
Views: 52282 The Economist
Vikki Hankins, VMH Digital Magazine on Marketing Unbound NYC by The Economist
 
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Vikki Hankins/VMH Digital Magazine shares insight on a recent Marketing Forum featuring top global brands, such as the NFL, JetBlue, PayPal, Dun & Bradstreet, Hilton Worldwide and a host of others. The event (Marketing Unbound), was hosted by The Economist and held in New York City's the Park at Time Warner Center. #MarketingUnbound helped marketers and company heads navigate through new marketing challenges, providing marketing tips and guidance. Visit The Economist YouTube channel for event highlights and additional marketing information.
Views: 145 Vikki Jones
The real reason Boeing's new plane crashed twice
 
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This isn’t just a computer bug. It’s a scandal. Join the Video Lab! http://bit.ly/video-lab Two Boeing airplanes have fallen out of the air and crashed in the past six months. On the surface, this is a technical failure. But the real story is about a company's desire to beat their rival. Read about Boeing's efforts to get the 737 Max reinstated for flight here: https://www.vox.com/2019/4/5/18296646/boeing-737-max-mcas-software-update Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Views: 7186092 Vox
Discover Osaka: sushi, tattoos, and a flourishing nightlife | The Economist
 
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Japan’s second city has become the country's fastest growing tourist hotspot. Famed for its food, Osaka stands apart from other cities in Japan. A sushi chef, a poet and a tattoo artist show us why their city is the top choice for the culturally curious visitor in the latest episode of our Passport travel series. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Discover Hyderabad: https://youtu.be/K6R-WGOqjC0 Discover Colombo: https://youtu.be/4COeTrjB6hA Discover Buenos Aires: https://youtu.be/q0pMg6rvc0s Discover Miami: https://youtu.be/sCi4FBN-7dA Discover London: https://youtu.be/mIEsgVd17v8 Passport is an original travel series for the intellectually and culturally curious, exploring some of the most exciting city destinations in the world. The insiders’ guide to each city follows at the shoulder of three local characters as they reveal the experiences and places not covered in the guidebooks. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 472478 The Economist
The Economist magazine Subscription in single click-Bharat Book Bureau
 
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Bharat Book Bureau is the official channel partner for  The Economist Magazines. Our Newspaper and Magazines gives you access to wide range of global news and information. We have the best of the lot of offer you.
Views: 34 Bharat Book
The Economist Magazine |New world order |Cover Predicting Future |Urdu /Hindi.....(DANISH SIDDIQUE)
 
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The Economist Magazine| New world order |Cover Predicting Future | Urdu /Hindi .........(DANISH SIDDIQUE) The Economist: is an English-language weekly magazine-format newspaper owned by the Economist Group and edited at offices in London.Continuous publication began under its founder James Wilson in September 1843. In 2015, its average weekly circulation was a little over 1.5 million, about half of which were sold in the United States. Pearson PLC held a 50% shareholding via The Financial Times Limited until August 2015. At that time, Pearson sold their share in the Economist. The Agnelli family's Exor paid £287m to raise their stake from 4.7% to 43.4% while the Economist paid £182m for the balance of 5.04m shares which will be distributed to current shareholders.[9] Aside from the Agnelli family, smaller shareholders in the company include Cadbury, Rothschild (21%), Schroder, Layton and other family interests as well as a number of staff and former staff shareholders History: Front page of The Economist on 16 May 1846 The Economist was founded by the British businessman and banker James Wilson in 1843, to advance the repeal of the Corn Laws, a system of import tariffs.[17] A prospectus for the "newspaper" from 5 August 1843 enumerated thirteen areas of coverage that its editors wanted the publication to focus on:[18] Original leading articles, in which free-trade principles will be most rigidly applied to all the important questions of the day. Articles relating to some practical, commercial, agricultural, or foreign topic of passing interest, such as foreign treaties. An article on the elementary principles of political economy, applied to practical experience, covering the laws related to prices, wages, rent, exchange, revenue and taxes. 1- facebook https://www.facebook.com/danish.siddi... 2- whatsapp 0313-9955506 3- email [email protected] [email protected] 4- channel link 1- https://youtu.be/zvTUq7XyLAs 2- https://youtu.be/--RvpV6IBS8 3- https://youtu.be/YsnZoVwLnpY 5-VIDEO LINK https://youtu.be/pl4AfTDW4t4 6-CAMRA MAN DANISH SIDDIQUE #DANISHSIDDIQUE786 #NWO
Views: 149 DANISH SIDDIQUE
Doing Business In Japan - Episode 1 - The Airport Economist
 
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The Airport Economist is your guide to doing business in the Asian Century. Led by renowned economist Tim Harcourt, we'll be visiting thriving markets all across Asia to find out what the emerging opportunities are for doing business there, how to get your foot in the door, learn from companies who are successfully operating there, as well as discover the local culture. In this first episode we visit the thriving city of Tokyo and talk to all sorts of local and international experts about the ins and outs of business here, and what you need to know. http://www.theairporteconomist.com/ https://www.facebook.com/The-Airport-Economist
Views: 4168 Airport Economist
CAREERS IN BA ECONOMICS –  MA,P.hD,Teacher,Economist,Job Opportunities,Salary Package
 
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CAREERS IN BA ECONOMICS.Go through the career opportunities of BA ECONOMICS, Govt jobs and Employment News channel from Freshersworld.com – The No.1 job portal for freshers in India. Visit http://www.freshersworld.com?src=Youtube for detailed Career information,Job Opportunities,Education details of BA ECONOMICS. Economics is a field which will never dwindle. There might be an increase in technology in the last century or so, but there has been no difference whatsoever for the need of economists in the world. In India, there has been a serious growth in the jobs available for individuals with degrees in economics. There are many reasons that are quoted for this significant growth. Privatization of banks, globalization, open markets are some of the few reasons as to why job options for people with degrees in economics have increased in India recently. There are many choices available in both public and private sectors for people with degrees in economics. The public sector jobs offer you financial stability and also offer you a definitive level of prestige in the community. The foremost of the government jobs available to you are in the Indian Economics Service (IES). These are some highly sought after jobs, and it helps to be a great student while applying for these jobs. Then, there are jobs in the reserve bank of India, PSU’s and other public sector banks. There are quite a few job openings in the private sector as well. You can apply for a job in many multinational companies, BPO’s in the management domains. You can also consider the option of applying for the many private sector banks and other such institutions. A career as a journalist is also viable with your degree in economics. You can pursue your goal of becoming a journalist by becoming an economics journalist at a newspaper or a magazine. If you want to further your education, then a master’s degree in economics is the most logical option. If you are considering a private job, the an MBA degree could be quite helpful. You can also consider the option of becoming a lawyer by studying LLB too. There is a good range to further your studies in, and there is absolutely no lack of good colleges in the country for this. These are some of the jobs you can choose with your degree in economics: • Accounting • Auditor • Banking and Finance • Insurance Investment • Marketing • Stock Broker • Media Analyst • Management • Manufacturing • Advertising • Communication • Actuarial • Education and Research • Retailing • System Analysis The pay packet is quite lucrative too. As a fresher, you can expect anywhere between 4 and 8 lakhs per annum, in the field of economics. There is a huge potential for growth. And, for some of the more brilliant students among you, the pay packet can be further improved. A Masters degree will further help your cause. You can get many better paying jobs with a master’s degree in economics, or with a MBA degree. There are obviously a lot of career choices available for you. But, the truth is for you to proceed further you need to put in more effort and time into your education. For more jobs & career information and daily job alerts, subscribe to our channel and support us. You can also install our Mobile app for govt jobs for getting regular notifications on your mobile. Freshersworld.com is the No.1 job portal for freshers jobs in India. Check Out website for more Jobs & Careers. http://www.freshersworld.com?src=Youtube - - ***Disclaimer: This is just a career guidance video for fresher candidates. The name, logo and properties mentioned in the video are proprietary property of the respective companies. The career and job information mentioned are an indicative generalised information. In no way Freshersworld.com, indulges into direct or indirect recruitment process of the respective companies.
Prof Steve Keen - Clueless Central Banks & Turning Japanese
 
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Prof Steve Keen - Clueless Central Banks & Turning Japanese Central bankers have become rock stars. But did their actions actually cause the financial crisis. Were they responsible for the economic collapse during the 2008 global financial crisis? Today I sit down with Australian economist Prof Steve Keen to discuss what they have wrong, what they are ignoring & what the future has in store for developed economies. Are we heading down the same path as Japan? #economics #money #debt https://twitter.com/ProfSteveKeen patreon.com/ProfSteveKeen 🎓 Learn more about Nugget’s Crypto Community: https://nuggetsnews.com.au/nuggets-crypto-community/ 🎧 Nugget's Crypto Podcast : http://nuggetsnews.com.au/podcast 👫👭👬Socials Facebook: http://fb.me/NuggetsNews Twitter: https://twitter.com/NuggetsNewsAU LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/NuggetsNews Instagram: http://instagram.com/NuggetsNewsAU Reddit: https://steemit.com/@NuggetsNews 📬 Join our Mailing List: https://nuggetsnews.com.au/newsletter/ 📲 Contact Us: http://bit.ly/2tHKKwN 🇦🇺 Own Cryptocurrency in your Self Managed Super Fund https://newbrightoncapital.com/nugget ("NUGGET" When completing the application) 🇦🇺Australian Crypto Tax: https://cryptotaxaus.com.au/nuggets-news/ or mention: 'Nugget's News' for 10% discount. 🏦 Need to purchase/sell large amounts of crypto? https://calebandbrown.com/ (Discount code: Nugget's News) 🎤 Hire me to Speak: https://www.linkedin.com/in/AlexSaundersAU/ 👕 Crypto Clothing: http://shrsl.com/nf7o 🔐 Secure your crypto Ledger: https://www.ledgerwallet.com/r/f536 Trezor: https://shop.trezor.io?a=esyfabvzr6zu Ecomi: https://securewallet.shop/products/secure-wallet (Discount Code: NUGGET) 🏦 Some of my favourite places to buy & trade coins: Coinspot: https://www.coinspot.com.au?affiliate=YNV53 Abra: Get $25 free when you sign up to trade with Abra & deposit $5 or more: https://invite.abra.com/CY0netIemV Bitmex: https://www.bitmex.com/register/NFIXYP Coinbase: https://www.coinbase.com/join/54152b230bf6fa71dd000002 Binance: https://www.binance.com/?ref=10788816 Binance EU: https://www.binance.je/?ref=35028437 KuCoin: https://www.kucoin.com/#/?r=188MQ Huobi: https://www.huobi.com.au/invite-success?invite_code=j4223 BiBox: https://www.bibox.com/signPage?id=11468551&lang=en BitFinex: https://www.bitfinex.com/?refcode=FJfGA79ciH EthFinex: https://www.ethfinex.com/?refcode=FJfGA79ciH The Chart Guys: 🎓 Crypto Trading Course: Discount code: Nugget10 https://www.chartguys.com/courses/crypto/?ref=5 🎓 Crypto Alerts System: Discount code: NUGGY10 https://crypto.chartguys.com?af=539351d975 Trader Cobb: Advanced Trading Courses: Discount code: TCNUGGET10 🎓https://www.tradercobb.com/cryptocurrency-education-courses/ Disclaimer: I AM NOT A LICENSED FINANCIAL ADVISOR. MY VIEWS ARE GENERAL IN NATURE AND SHOULD NOT BE TAKEN AS FINANCIAL ADVICE. ALWAYS DO YOUR OWN RESEARCH BEFORE INVESTING ANY MONEY.
Views: 17403 Nugget's News
Gulf Publishing Company and World Oil 100th Year Anniversary
 
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Founded in 1916, Gulf Publishing Company produces and distributes leading trade journals, industry research, databases, software, publications, conferences and events designed for the needs of the energy industry. Gulf Publishing Company is headquartered in Houston, Texas, and has offices throughout the world. Our flagship publications are Hydrocarbon Processing, World Oil, Gas Processing and Petroleum Economist
Views: 791 World Oil
What to expect in 2018, according to The Economist
 
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With only three weeks left in 2017, The Economist is looking ahead. The magazine's Executive Editor, Daniel Franklin joins CBSN to discuss what to expect in 2018 from Pyongyang to Silicon Valley.
Views: 8168 CBS News