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Frederic Raphael - How Somerset Maugham has influenced my writing (125/144)
 
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To listen to more of Frederic Raphael’s stories, go to the playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NMEcyMudjHY&list=PLVV0r6CmEsFy1lPaJ5aCO1R19vqlZ7Wes Born in 1931 in America, Frederic Raphael is a writer who has written more than 20 novels, five volumes of short stories and biographies. He also won an Oscar for writing the script to "Darling" and wrote the screenplay for the acclaimed film "Eyes Wide Shut". [Listener: Christopher Sykes] TRANSCRIPT: There's a thing that André Malraux once said – he said a lot of things actually and many of them were slightly dotty and certainly self-advancing to the nth degree, but he was a smart fellow. And one of the things he said... I think it was in that book of his about the imaginary museum which he talked about where each of us has an imaginary museum in which are hung the pieces of work that we admire and somehow have changed our lives, and one could extend that into a library and I will in a minute, perhaps. But... André Malraux said: one doesn't become an artist by looking at life, one becomes an artist by looking at art. And that is both true and a bit untrue in my view because, of course, Malraux was to some extent an ideologically driven person. First of all, by Marxism and the... and the communist party, and then, eventually, by this Gaullist French nationalism, you might say, which also articulated his style. Because of my Anglo-American provenance, I don't feel any specific allegiance to... certainly to national allegiances of any kind. But American writers have influenced me a lot more than, I suspect, English writers have... English writers have been influenced by English writers. However, the main influence, as I've said often enough to be boring, was Somerset Maugham whose 'Of Human Bondage' I picked up when I was 15 and who seemed, as they say, to speak to my case – that's what certain kinds of writers manage to do, whatever your case is. I don't think that Willie Maugham was a great writer, a great writer of English, I mean. In fact, to open one of his books is often to be slightly shocked by the number of clichés and all the rest of it. I think there are reasons for that which is that he was French, his first language was French, and he tended all through his life to think that clichés were in English rather what they are in French, but they're not quite the same. The French use standard phrases to describe standard things because their language is like that. The English, because of the wealth of words and terms available, tend to deprecate the repetition of tired phrases. But Maugham first of all taught me that you... well, a very clever thing he said once about how, if you have to choose between having dinner with a diplomat and a vet, you should have dinner with the vet. The diplomat will tell you the things which you... he thinks you want to hear or what he would like you to believe are typical of him, but the vet will tell you, if you're lucky, one or two very interesting stories because he won't have the wit or the guile to conceal himself. And on the whole, this is a good... good advice. The thing about Willie Maugham is that he is generally deprecated by all the smart, critical folk, and they have good reasons and I've just explained what some of them are. But the odd thing about him is that rare among English writers of his time – that is to say, of the turn of the century and of the 20th century – he doesn't actually have any violent prejudices against anybody. His prejudices are, to some extent, evenly distributed in the tone of his prose, that is to say that he is ironical about many people, including Jews and, of course, the English. He wrote, I think, in the 1890s, when he was a young man: the English abroad imagine that they are... they are admired for their sterling moral qualities. Just wait until they lose their money – that's when they'll find out what people really think of them. And that is, of course, exactly what the English today have absolutely refused to admit about themselves in the world. As Cavafy said to EM Forster, 'Above all, my dear Forster, don't lose your capital'. Well, the English have not lost all their capital but they've lost a lot. And certainly, they lost their capital ships. Nevertheless, they posture about the place as if their opinions matter to people like Master Putin, who actually doesn't give a shit about the English. Willie Maugham taught me to work hard, and also, I suppose, to be a professional. Not only in the vulgar sense that Virginia Woolf attached to him of doing things for money. Because that's what you have to do if you don't have any. Funny that, particularly if you have a family, but also in terms of a certain detachment... Visit [https://www.webofstories.com/play/frederic.raphael/125] to read the remaining part of the transcript and to view more of Frederic Raphael’s inspiring thoughts and life stories.
Somerset Maugham Compilation (1920-1949)
 
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Compilation of various Pathe material featuring Somerset Maugham. i) 1947 - Maugham talks of how his writing is autobiographical. He sits at his desk and talks of how his characters are founded on people he knows. "Fact and fiction are so intermingled in my work that ... I can hardly distinguish one from the other." He repeats statements that had been made against him by critics. He talks about the tradition of the telling of tales. ii) The second extract is silent - date unknown. Maugham walks through a park. He then stands on a balcony overlooking a city - unidentified. Could be somewhere on the banks of the Rhine. Other people stand with Maugham. We see him walk through the gardens of what is possibly an old college or palace or castle. M/S of Maugham sitting at a table talking to a fashion designer- or it could be his private secretary. Maugham smokes a cigarette and looks at some drawings - they could be drawings for a stage show. C/Us of the two men talking. Maugham puts on his spectacles and moves a small paper boat around on the table. (The Owl and the Pussycat?) They look at more drawings. A woman comes to the table with more drawings. One of the drawings is signed with Maugham's name - perhaps the drawing represents him when he was young or perhaps they are his drawings? C/Us of some drawings of what is probably stage sets. We see Maugham sign one of the drawings (the one we saw before with his signature.) L/S of the veranda upon which they are sitting - possibly Maugham's villa in the Riviera. iii) "Camera interviews - Mr W Somerset Maugham." - item from Eve's Film Review issue number 434. See record of the above name, found in EP112. iv) 1947 - Maugham in his library choosing a book. C/U of him flipping through the pages then reading a page and putting it back on the shelf. FILM ID:3252.13 A VIDEO FROM BRITISH PATHÉ. EXPLORE OUR ONLINE CHANNEL, BRITISH PATHÉ TV. IT'S FULL OF GREAT DOCUMENTARIES, FASCINATING INTERVIEWS, AND CLASSIC MOVIES. http://www.britishpathe.tv/ FOR LICENSING ENQUIRIES VISIT http://www.britishpathe.com/ British Pathé also represents the Reuters historical collection, which includes more than 120,000 items from the news agencies Gaumont Graphic (1910-1932), Empire News Bulletin (1926-1930), British Paramount (1931-1957), and Gaumont British (1934-1959), as well as Visnews content from 1957 to the end of 1979. All footage can be viewed on the British Pathé website. https://www.britishpathe.com/
Views: 6620 British Pathé
TOP 50 Quotes About Writing
 
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TOP 50 Quotes About Writing. Wallpapers - https://quotefancy.com/quotes-about-writing “There is something delicious about writing the first words of a story. You never quite know where they’ll take you.” — Beatrix Potter (00:00) “If you want to be a writer, you must do two things above all others: read a lot and write a lot.” — Stephen King (00:07) “I write to give myself strength. I write to be the characters that I am not. I write to explore all the things I’m afraid of. ” — Joss Whedon (00:14) “Start writing, no matter what. The water does not flow until the faucet is turned on.” — Louis L'Amour (00:21) “Don’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.” — Anton Chekhov (00:28) “This is how you do it: you sit down at the keyboard and you put one word after another until its done. It's that easy, and that hard.” — Neil Gaiman (00:35) “You can make anything by writing.” — C. S. Lewis (00:42) “The scariest moment is always just before you start.” — Stephen King (00:49) “Writing is a socially acceptable form of schizophrenia.” — E. L. Doctorow (00:56) “There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.” — Frank Herbert (01:03) “I can shake off everything as I write; my sorrows disappear, my courage is reborn.” — Anne Frank (01:10) “You can, you should, and if you’re brave enough to start, you will.” — Stephen King (01:17) “Tears are words that need to be written.” — Paulo Coelho (01:24) “After nourishment, shelter and companionship, stories are the thing we need most in the world.” — Philip Pullman (01:31) “Imagination is like a muscle. I found out that the more I wrote, the bigger it got.” — Philip José Farmer (01:38) “There are three rules for writing a novel. Unfortunately, no one knows what they are.” — W. Somerset Maugham (01:45) “We write to taste life twice, in the moment and in retrospect.” — Anaïs Nin (01:52) “All you have to do is write one true sentence. Write the truest sentence that you know.” — Ernest Hemingway (01:59) “Words can be like X-rays if you use them properly – they’ll go through anything. You read and you’re pierced.” — Aldous Huxley (02:06) “I always start writing with a clean piece of paper and a dirty mind. ” — Patrick Dennis (02:13) “If there’s a book that you want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.” — Toni Morrison (02:20) “Fantasy is hardly an escape from reality. It’s a way of understanding it.” — Lloyd Alexander (02:27) “Being a writer is a very peculiar sort of a job: it’s always you versus a blank sheet of paper (or a blank screen) and quite often the blank piece of paper wins.” — Neil Gaiman (02:34) “Fiction is the truth inside the lie.” — Stephen King (02:41) “The secret to getting ahead is getting started.” — Mark Twain (02:48) “A writer is someone for whom writing is more difficult than it is for other people.” — Thomas Mann (02:55) “When I sit down to write a book, I do not say to myself, ‘I am going to produce a work of art.’ I write it because there is some lie that I want to expose, some fact to which I want to draw attention, and my initial concern is to get a hearing.” — George Orwell (03:02) “Writing a book is a horrible, exhausting struggle, like a long bout with some painful illness. One would never undertake such a thing if one were not driven on by some demon whom one can neither resist nor understand.” — George Orwell (03:09) “One day I will find the right words, and they will be simple.” — Jack Kerouac (03:16) “The role of a writer is not to say what we can all say, but what we are unable to say.” — Anaïs Nin (03:23) “No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader.” — Robert Frost (03:30) “You can't wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club.” — Jack London (03:37) “We are all apprentices in a craft where no one ever becomes a master.” — Ernest Hemingway (03:44) “A little talent is a good thing to have if you want to be a writer. But the only real requirement is the ability to remember every scar.” — Stephen King (03:51) “If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write. Simple as that.” — Stephen King (03:58) “Every secret of a writer’s soul, every experience of his life, every quality of his mind, is written large in his works.” — Virginia Woolf (04:05) “I write to discover what I know.” — Flannery O'Connor (04:12) “The road to hell is paved with works-in-progress.” — Philip Roth (04:19) “I don’t care if a reader hates one of my stories, just as long as he finishes the book.” — Roald Dahl (04:26) Music: Over Time - Vibe Tracks TFB9 - Vibe Tracks
Views: 746 Quotefancy
French Joe
 
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William Somerset Maugham was born in 1874 and educated at the King’s School, Canterbury and Heidelberg University. He spent some time at St Thomas’s Hospital as a medical student but was attracted from medicine to letters by the success of his first novel, Liza of Lambeth (1897), in which he drew on what he had seen in the district served by his hospital. He also drew on his medical experience in his first masterpiece, Of Human Bondage (1915). Upon the appearance of The Moon and Sixpence (1919) his reputation as a novelist was established. He was at the same time a successful playwright, his last play, Sheppey, appearing in 1933. Apart from short stones, his work included essays, criticism, autobiography and travel books. A widely travelled man, he spent much of the 1914–18 war abroad in the intelligence service–the time in which he laid the basis of the ‘Ashenden’ stories. In the ’twenties he took up residence in the south of France and, but for the last war, lived there until his death in December 1965. The stories published here were largely written in the three decades following the First World War. Although Maugham had written short stories early in his career, preoccupation with his other writing led to a long interval before he next took up the form, on a voyage in the South Seas in 1919, originally as a relief from other work. It is consequently an irony which he would have appreciated that many consider him to be at his best in his short stories. When he stopped writing them he made a collection of those that he wished to preserve and arranged them in the order felt to be most agreeable to the reader. This edition as far as possible preserves that arrangement. A good part of the success of his stories derives from the technique that Maugham used. He discussed this in the preface to the first American edition of his collected short stories and compared it with the contrasting techniques of Chekhov and de Maupassant. Chekhov had markedly superior characterisation, he said, but de Maupassant did give his short stories a beginning, a middle and an end–which Maugham approved, and which is the key to his style: ‘My prepossessions in the arts are on the side of law and order. I like a story that fits.’ Such was his answer to critics who had applied the word ‘competent’ to his stories, disparagingly as they thought–and, judging by the stories’ vast and continuing popularity, unwisely. Following this principle, Maugham developed a style which was as ordered as his general plan. His sentences are short. They balance one another and are balanced in themselves. They are a highly appropriate form for his narratives, stamped as they are by their fluency and discursiveness. Moreover, it is a style equally suited to Maugham’s view of his characters: a view that is largely detached, cool, at times slightly cynical but tempered constantly by a wry sense of humour–as illustrated by ‘Jane’. Maugham is, however, at ease equally in pure comedy (‘The Facts of Life’) and in high tragedy (‘The Unconquered’). His stories are with the same felicity as varied in mood as they are in setting. Each of these stories can stand on its own. Maugham himself wrote that such a compactness of technique, character and incident may seem disconcerting in a world where at least one loose end is normally left behind; but the compactness is part of the method used by such short story writers as Maugham. As he put it in his own distinctive way, such a writer ‘seeks to prove nothing. He paints a picture and sets it before you. You can take it or leave it.’ Most take it.
Views: 472 linked29
Audiobook: The Summing Up by W. Somerset Maugham
 
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Buy full audiobook: http://www.qksrv.net/interactive?aid=10653481&pid=3861424&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.audible.com%2Fadbl%2Fstore%2Fwelcome.jsp%3Fsource_code%3DCOMA0211WS021909%26entryRedirect%3D%2Fentry%2Foffers%2FproductPromo2.jsp%26entryParams%3D%5EproductID%7EBK_ACON_000041 William Somerset Maugham (1874?1965) was born at the height of British imperial power. When he died, the British Empire was all but a memory. In Maugham's lifetime, as his civilization slowly disappeared, people from all walks of life, the proud, the urbane, the crude, and the desperate, passed beneath the lens of his dispassionate scrutiny. Transformed into some of the most unforgettable literary works of the 20th century, his experiences re-emerged in his plays, fiction, and essays. No other writer possessed his keen ability of observation. It was an ability so well honed that his work makes you feel as if you have been drawn into an intimate conversation with the century's most arresting and sophisticated personality. The Summing Up represents Maugham's life and philosophy in his own words. It is autobiographical in nature, though most of the work is concerned with Maugham's unique and fascinating opinions on the theater, writing, metaphysics, and the interesting people he encountered in his long and successful career. His style is very conversational and you feel yourself settling into an intellectual odyssey led by a man who lived life to its fullest. Sixty years afterThe Summing Up was published, Maugham's controversial insights and opinions continue to stimulate conversation and debate. This is one of the most entertaining, self-revealing pieces of all time.
Views: 1619 1987kuttan
Profile: Howard Fast
 
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"Howard had a tremendous interest in America—and a tremendous love for this country," says Mimi Fast, wife of the late novelist Howard Fast. Fast (1914--2003) was one of the most prolific American writers of the twentieth century. He was a bestselling author of more than eighty works of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and screenplays. In 1950, his refusal to provide the United States Congress with a list of possible Communist associates earned him a three-month prison sentence. During his incarceration, Fast wrote one of his best-known novels, Spartacus (1951). Throughout his long career, Fast matched his commitment to championing social justice in his writing with a deft, lively storytelling style. For the first time, sixty-three of his works will be available as ebooks. Watch Mimi Fast, son and author Jonathan Fast, and author and daughter-in-law Erica Jong speak about his legacy. Learn more at http://www.openroadmedia.com/authors/howard-fast.aspx
Views: 3573 Open Road Media
The Summing Up Audiobook by W Somerset Maugham
 
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Listen to the full audiobook The Summing Up for free at audilib.com Format: Unabridged Written by: W Somerset Maugham Narrated by: Andrew Wincott Publisher: Audible Studios Release date: 12/6/2012 Duration: 8 hrs and 30 mins Language: English Genres: Personal Memoirs Autobiographical without being an autobiography, confessional without disclosing his private self, The Summing Up, written when Maugham was sixty-four, is an inimitable expression of a personal credo. It is not only a classic avowal of a professional author's ideas about style, literature, art, drama and philosophy, but also an illuminating insight into this great writer's craft. Contact: [email protected]
Views: 12 Hans Barr
"The End of Something"  by Ernest Hemingway (read by Tom O'Bedlam)
 
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This story was written when Hemingway was about 25 years old. Nick Adams is a character in many Hemingway's stories - maybe he represents the writer himself. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_End_of_Something "His distinctive writing style, characterized by economy and understatement, influenced 20th-century fiction" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernest_Hemingway This is one of the set works, part of the AQA Anthology for the GCSE examination in British Schools: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AQA_Anthology http://www.teachit.co.uk/armoore/anthology/theendofsomething.htm Hortons Bay is a real place and it is well aware of its connection with Hemingway: http://www.mynorth.com/My-North/May-2006/Hemingways-Horton-Bay/
Views: 34558 SpokenVerse
What Are The Signs That I Could Become A Writer?
 
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What Are The Signs That I Could Become A Writer? Writing TV has a bunch of videos on technique and a free download of Stephen King's audiobook on the craft of writing: http://learntowrite.download/index.php/learn-how-to-be-a-great-writer-from-stephen-king-download-the-entire-audibook-free/ I mean, if you're going to learn from anyone, who better? Hmmm. Naturally talented you say. Looking for signs you could be a writer. Have you checked your horoscope? Do you believe in Astrology? Yes indeed, so many questions, if only some signs to help us find the answers. But what Source(s): https://www.quora.com/What-are-the-signs-that-I-could-become-a-writer More: https://youtu.be/242VMwQttsI Subscribe to our channel!
Views: 7 Writing TV
Writing & the Moon: Author Tim Ferriss
 
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Writing & the Moon - http://divinetimeastrology.com. Marie Forleo Interview of Tim Ferriss: https://youtu.be/h3X9OFzF6ds Using the Vedic Jaimini technique to show if you are a writer by using the birth chart of author Tim Ferriss. Tim Ferriss is an author, entrepreneur, angel investor, philanthropist, podcaster, speaker, and researcher. He is one multi-talented guy (Mercury dominated)! Using the Vedic Jaimini technique I show how his birth chart indicates writing as one of his talents as well as other talents he has. Read my first blog post on the Moon & Writing and find out if YOU are a writer with my Special Offer reading: http://divinetimeastrology.com/2018/0...
Views: 205 DivineTimeAstrology
1965 Intimations - Lawrence Durrell
 
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Intimations | Lawrence Durrell Strong opinions from the author of 'The Alexandria Quartet'. CHANNEL | BBC 2 FIRST BROADCAST | 19 October 1965 SYNOPSIS Malcolm Muggeridge asks Lawrence Durrell about his life and the impact his experiences have had on his writing. Durrell speaks about the shock of moving from the diverse wildness of India to the safety of suburban England, his admiration for Henry Miller and DH Lawrence, and the importance of sex in his life and work. In characteristically controversial style, Durrell expresses strong opinions on both Irish people and the value of women. CONTRIBUTORS Malcolm Muggeridge - Presenter Lawrence Durrell - Contributor Margaret McCall - Producer
Views: 494 Johnny Revolver
Form Mood Tone Attitude | Advance Reading and Writing Skills | Bengali Lecture | PRC Foundation
 
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This is Bengali lecture on mood, tone, form, attitude, style, audience for the course Advance Reading & Writing Skills Specially for National University Bangladesh.
Graham Greene
 
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Graham Greene 4:17 Part 1: Early years (1904–1925) 7:38 Part 2: Writing career 11:07 Part 3: Travel and espionage 14:37 Part 4: Personal life 16:53 Part 5: Final years and death 19:39 Part 6: Writing style and themes 29:32 Part 7: Legacy 32:58 Part 8: Select works 36:50 Metadata Audiobook for https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graham_Greene All text, either derivative works from Wikipedia Articles or original content shared here, is licensed under: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ A full list of the authors of the original content can be found here: https://xtools.wmflabs.org/articleinfo/en.wikipedia.org/Graham_Greene https://www.patreon.com/FrogCast https://www.paypal.me/FrogCast Socialism: History of Socialism
Views: 129 FrogCast
Writing Fiction & Poetry : Writing Techniques for Novels
 
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Novel writing techniques vary from writer to writer, but outlines are typically helpful, as are revision sessions of large bodies of work. Discover a personal writing process that gets the job done with tips from a published author and English professor in this free video on writing. Expert: David M. Harris Bio: David M. Harris has taught English at Vanderbilt University and elsewhere. Filmmaker: Dimitri LaBarge
Views: 26155 expertvillage
Romulus Linney - A tour of his writing space
 
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Playwright Romulus Linney IV (1930 -- 2011) was raised in Boone, North Carolina and Madison, Tennessee. Many of his plays have Appalachian settings (Tennessee, Holy Ghosts, Sand Mountain, Gint, and Heathen Valley) while others focus on European and military themes (The Sorrows of Frederick, 2, The Love Suicides at the Schofield Barracks. Childe Byron is his romantic play about Lord Byron. Linney received a BA from Oberlin College and an MFA from the Yale School of Drama. Romulus Linney was interviewed by Mike Wood on January 14, 2003 at Linney's home in Germantown, NY. The interview segments are courtesy of the William Inge Center for the Arts in Independence, Kansas.
Views: 1123 ingecenter
Bores by E.V. Lucas in Hindi and English for NET TGT PGT
 
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Bores is an essay of E. V. Lucas. hare and support us. Escholar 360 is all about education and entertainment, we are trying to make education easy for students as well as we are trying to give you healthy entertainment and inspirational videos, so keep touch with us, For subscribe our channel here https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3MKGiItBxSbP0r1VSTrpxA?sub_confirmation=1 #Bores #Englishliterature #EVLucas Sound By: www.bensound.com twitter https://twitter.com/afsar069 facebook https://www.facebook.com/Escholar360/ linked in https://www.linkedin.com/feed/
Views: 17879 Escholar 360
Horatio Clare - Writers in Conversation
 
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Writers in Conversation features some of today’s best fiction writers, poets, non-fiction writers and playwrights reading from their work and talking about their writing lifestyle - how characters take shape and where ideas come from. Led by creative writing lecturers at the University of Southampton, the event takes place in Nuffield Kitchen, helping to create an evening that is relaxed, engaging and intelligent, yet informal. Horatio Clare is the author of two memoirs, Running for the Hills and Truant; three books of nature and travel, A Single Swallow, Down to the Sea In Ships, and Orison for a Curlew; a novella, The Prince's Pen; an anthology, Sicily Through Writers' Eyes, and most recently a novel for children, Aubrey and the Terrible Yoot, a Sunday Times children's book of the year. Variously a journalist, teacher, radio producer, lecturer and broadcaster, Horatio began life as a sheep-dog substitute, herding flocks in the Black Mountains of south Wales. His work has been listed for numerous prizes, winning the Somerset Maugham award, the Foreign Press Association award and the Standford-Dolman Travel Book of the Year 2015. Horatio contributes to numerous international publications and radio programmes, with regular essays for the Financial Times and From Our Own Correspondent. He is currently lecturing in creative writing at Liverpool John Moores.
Peter Ackroyd
 
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Peter Ackroyd, CBE, FRSL is an English biographer, novelist and critic with a particular interest in the history and culture of London. For his novels about English history and culture and his biographies of, among others, William Blake, Charles Dickens, T. S. Eliot and Sir Thomas More, he won the Somerset Maugham Award and two Whitbread Awards. He is noted for the volume of work he has produced, the range of styles therein, his skill at assuming different voices and the depth of his research. He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature in 1984 and appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 2003. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 374 Audiopedia
Workshop - Hills Like White Elephants (Ernest Hemingway) - Stripped Cover Lit Writer's Workshop
 
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Stripped Cover Lit breaks down Hills Like White Elephants by Ernest Hemingway in this week's Writer's Workshop. Music: http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music
Views: 1193 Stripped Cover Lit
What Happened in 2018?
 
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I wanted to chat with you about the highs and lows of 2018, plus some favourite things. Click ‘Show More’ for links to everything mentioned. xx — If you like my videos and podcasts, please consider supporting me on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/jenvcampbell — MY BOOKS: THE GIRL AQUARIUM: https://tinyurl.com/yd426vap Signed copies: http://www.jen-campbell.co.uk/shop.html THE BEGINNING OF THE WORLD IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT https://tinyurl.com/yatcm2ko Signed copies: http://www.jen-campbell.co.uk/shop.html FRANKLIN’S FLYING BOOKSHOP: http://tinyurl.com/mmfrq69 Signed copies: http://www.jen-campbell.co.uk/shop.html FRANKLIN AND LUNA GO TO THE MOON https://tinyurl.com/ybjsrawo Signed copies http://www.jen-campbell.co.uk/shop.html THE BOOKSHOP BOOK: http://tinyurl.com/zxoqbex Signed copies: http://www.jen-campbell.co.uk/shop.html THE HUNGRY GHOST FESTIVAL: http://tinyurl.com/d9c44ky Signed copies: http://www.jen-campbell.co.uk/shop.html WEIRD THINGS CUSTOMERS SAY IN BOOKSHOPS: http://tinyurl.com/z6qdah3 Signed copies: http://www.jen-campbell.co.uk/shop.html MORE WEIRD THINGS CUSTOMERS SAY IN BOOKSHOPS: http://tinyurl.com/zrt8hrv Signed Copies: http://www.jen-campbell.co.uk/shop.html — THINGS MENTIONED: Video where I talked about Japan: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mosrs8f28BM Video on eyesight: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JCnC5CPiUIw Events: http://www.jen-campbell.co.uk/events Writing Workshops: http://www.jen-campbell.co.uk/writing-workshops Editorial Services: http://www.jen-campbell.co.uk/editorial Forward Prizes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yQTzzT-RjD4 Somerset Maugham: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=08buS8vFAk8 BOOKS WITH JEN podcast: http://www.jen-campbell.co.uk/podcast Favourite books of 2018: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-JYmlF_5AJI A Place for Us: https://tinyurl.com/y9z5sks7 English Animals: https://tinyurl.com/y8wejv5u The Staircase: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bvv97sCcruY&t=5s The Assassination of Gianni Versace https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xL_qpDkF5A8 The People Vs OJ Simpson https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X7jwUVj0hHE Maniac https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6cDDmk-O5A Three Identical Strangers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c-OF0OaK3o0&t=4s Shoplifters: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9382rwoMiRc&t=5s Victoria: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kp8wcV3GjW0 Bohemian Rhapsody: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mP0VHJYFOAU&t=7s Lucy & Yak: https://lucyandyak.com/ Thought: https://www.wearethought.com/ The Ambrose Cafe: https://www.heals.com/heals-cafe My Dad Wrote a Porno: http://www.mydadwroteaporno.com/ My Favourite Murder: https://www.myfavoritemurder.com/ West Cork: https://www.audible.co.uk/ep/title?asin=B079M4J86L&source_code=M2M30DFT1BkSH101514006V&ds_rl=1241367 — WHO I AM Hello, my name's Jen. I'm an award-winning poet and short story writer. My debut short story collection 'The Beginning of the World in the Middle of the Night' is published by Two Roads, and my children's books, 'Franklin's Flying Bookshop’ and ‘Franklin and Luna Go To The Moon’ are published by Thames and Hudson. I'm also the author of the Sunday Times bestselling 'Weird Things Customers Say in Bookshops' series, 'The Bookshop Book' and 'The Hungry Ghost Festival.' I run writing workshops, give talks at universities & book festivals on a variety of topics, judge literary prizes, and take on freelance writing and editing. If you would like to speak with me about the possibility of working together, please get in touch via email: [email protected] x — Where to find me: Website: http://www.jen-campbell.co.uk Editorial services: http://www.jen-campbell.co.uk/editorial Writing Workshops: http://www.jen-campbell.co.uk/writing-workshops Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/jenvcampbell Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/jenvcampbell Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/jenvcampbell Events: http://www.jen-campbell.co.uk/events Podcast: http://www.jen-campbell.co.uk/podcast Facebook: http://tinyurl.com/3o3s4d2 Goodreads: http://tinyurl.com/hs8nxjm Email: [email protected] (Since starting Youtube, some of you have been asking what's wrong with my hands. This should answer any questions :) http://tinyurl.com/z3kzk24.) This video does not contain any sponsored content.
Views: 6529 Jen Campbell
When Life Becomes Fiction
 
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From sex to his great-aunt, Jonathan Ames' oeuvre is laced with a variety of obsessions, including the desire to let books themselves shape our fates Question: Are there any recurring obsessions in your works? Jonathan Ames: Well, I've written eight books and in almost all of my books there's a great-aunt character. I have a very close relationship with my great-aunt who's been a friend, like a grandmother. I may have spent more time with her than most human beings. So, I always have a character somewhat based on her in my books. So, that's a recurring theme. I think for my novel, "The Extra Man," my novel, "Wake Up Sir," the short story, Bored to Death very much play on this theme of someone being obsessed with books themselves, and wanting their life to be like something out of a book. For my novel, "The Extra Man," the character, from reading a lot of Somerset Maugham and Tomas Mann and Fitzgerald and Evelyn Waugh and P.G. Woodhouse, wanted to be what he thought of as a young gentleman. And he'd seen all these books as the literature of a young gentleman. How a young gentleman might live. And so he had this fantasy that he was a young gentleman. The book was kind of constructed almost like the "Magic Mountain," by Tomas Mann. And in my novel, "Wake Up Sir," in my mind it was very much about someone who had been driven insane by reading too much P.G. Woodhouse. And this all came from my spending a year reading "Don Quixote" and the way that Don Quixote read all these books on chivalry and believed that he was a knight. I really got into this notion of seeing life as this fantasy very much influenced by the books you read. And then the same thing with Bored to Death. The character has been rereading all of his Raymond Chandler novels and some David Goodis and he gets it in his mind that he should be a private detective. And so then the story is about someone being driven by literature to do something. And then I get to write it in the style of a thriller, whereas, with my novel Wake Up Sir, I kind of wrote it in my mind in the style of somewhat of a Woodhouse novel. So those are obsessions. I think obsessions with sexuality of trying to define oneself or trying to escape definition is also a theme. New York City -- most of my work is set in New York, except for Wake Up Sir. So these would be some of my themes. Recorded on: November 4, 2009 Question: Are there any recurring obsessions in your works? Jonathan Ames: Well, I've written eight books and in almost all of my books there's a great-aunt character. I have a very close relationship with my great-aunt who's been a friend, like a grandmother. I may have spent more time with her than most human beings. So, I always have a character somewhat based on her in my books. So, that's a recurring theme. I think for my novel, "The Extra Man," my novel, "Wake Up Sir," the short story, Bored to Death very much play on this theme of someone being obsessed with books themselves, and wanting their life to be like something out of a book. For my novel, "The Extra Man," the character, from reading a lot of Somerset Maugham and Tomas Mann and Fitzgerald and Evelyn Waugh and P.G. Woodhouse, wanted to be what he thought of as a young gentleman. And he'd seen all these books as the literature of a young gentleman. How a young gentleman might live. And so he had this fantasy that he was a young gentleman. The book was kind of constructed almost like the "Magic Mountain," by Tomas Mann. And in my novel, "Wake Up Sir," in my mind it was very much about someone who had been driven insane by reading too much P.G. Woodhouse. And this all came from my spending a year reading "Don Quixote" and the way that Don Quixote read all these books on chivalry and believed that he was a knight. I really got into this notion of seeing life as this fantasy very much influenced by the books you read. And then the same thing with Bored to Death. The character has been rereading all of his Raymond Chandler novels and some David Goodis and he gets it in his mind that he should be a private detective. And so then the story is about someone being driven by literature to do something. And then I get to write it in the style of a thriller, whereas, with my novel Wake Up Sir, I kind of wrote it in my mind in the style of somewhat of a Woodhouse novel. So those are obsessions. I think obsessions with sexuality of trying to define oneself or trying to escape definition is also a theme. New York City -- most of my work is set in New York, except for Wake Up Sir. So these would be some of my themes. Recorded on: November 4, 2009
Views: 199 Big Think
The Magician by Raymond E.FEIST {Book Review}
 
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In this short book review of the Magician i mention Raymond as being my favorite writer I've come across and why i love his style of writing so much. I also introduce my familiar into the fray (Leo) so you my viewers can meet more of my family behind the scenes
Views: 36 Roche Pienaar
A Booktube Christmas
 
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In which I cook Christmas dinner for Jean and Lauren, and we all have a giggle. All books mentioned are linked below. xx -- — SIGNED BOOKS FOR CHRISTMAS: http://www.jen-campbell.com/shop — MY BOOKS: THE BEGINNING OF THE WORLD IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT Book details: https://tinyurl.com/lnz5bb6 Paperback: https://tinyurl.com/yatcm2ko Signed copies: http://www.jen-campbell.co.uk/shop.html FRANKLIN’S FLYING BOOKSHOP: http://tinyurl.com/mmfrq69 Signed copies: http://www.jen-campbell.co.uk/shop.html THE BOOKSHOP BOOK: http://tinyurl.com/zxoqbex Signed copies: http://www.jen-campbell.co.uk/shop.html THE HUNGRY GHOST FESTIVAL: http://tinyurl.com/d9c44ky Signed copies: http://www.jen-campbell.co.uk/shop.html WEIRD THINGS CUSTOMERS SAY IN BOOKSHOPS: http://tinyurl.com/z6qdah3 Signed copies: http://www.jen-campbell.co.uk/shop.html MORE WEIRD THINGS CUSTOMERS SAY IN BOOKSHOPS: http://tinyurl.com/zrt8hrv Signed Copies: http://www.jen-campbell.co.uk/shop.html -- Lauren: http://www.youtube.com/readsanddaydreams Jean: http://www.youtube.com/bookishthoughts Somerset Maugham Award: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Somerset_Maugham_Award Last Year’s Winners: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jYqO9s5d5Yc -- WHO I AM Hello, my name's Jen. I'm an award-winning poet and short story writer. My debut short story collection 'The Beginning of the World in the Middle of the Night' is published by Two Roads, and my first children's book, 'Franklin's Flying Bookshop,' is published by Thames and Hudson. I'm also the author of the Sunday Times bestselling 'Weird Things Customers Say in Bookshops' series, 'The Bookshop Book' and 'The Hungry Ghost Festival.' I run writing workshops, give talks at universities & book festivals on a variety of topics, judge literary prizes, and take on freelance writing and editing. If you would like to speak with me about the possibility of working together, please get in touch via email: [email protected] x -- Where to find me: Website: http://www.jen-campbell.co.uk Writing Workshops: http://www.jen-campbell.co.uk/writing-workshops Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/jenvcampbell Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/jenvcampbell Events: http://www.jen-campbell.co.uk/events Podcast: http://www.jen-campbell.co.uk/podcast Facebook: http://tinyurl.com/3o3s4d2 Goodreads: http://tinyurl.com/hs8nxjm Blog: http://jen-campbell.blogspot.com Email: [email protected] (Since starting Youtube, some of you have been asking what's wrong with my hands. This should answer any questions :) http://tinyurl.com/z3kzk24.) NB This is not a sponsored video, and unless otherwise stated all books were bought by me.
Views: 9997 Jen Campbell
Masters of Landscape Photography book trailer
 
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Is it actually possible to master photography or any other art form for that matter? Landscape photography is as subjective as it is varied and popular. And that means it is surely impossible to say one photograph – or photographer is better than another as so much is down to personal taste. While this is undoubtedly true, the skill, mastery, innovation, and vision of some photographers simply stand out for all to see. Masters of Landscape Photography is a collection of work by an assorted group of undeniably talented and fortunate photographers. Landscape photography is one of the most popular genres for amateur photographers, with countless competitions and awards heavily subscribed by enthusiasts and professionals who are keen to pitch their work against their peers. Mastering the genre takes time: time to perfect exposure, colour, composition and – perhaps above all else – the ability to see and record the landscape in a way that will make your photographs stand above the rest. To set you on the path to success, Masters of Landscape Photography delves into the world of 16 leading lights, including; Art Wolfe, Colin Prior, Joe Cornish, Ross Hoddinott and Tom Mackie to name but a few. Each of these photographers has their own unique take on how, where and why the landscape should be recorded. Through probing Q&A style interviews, beautifully reproduced images and infographic diagrams, the reader is given an insight into the artist’s working practices, from the equipment they use to the techniques they employ to create their breath-taking and visionary works. It is our hopes that this unique look into the lives of the world’s master landscape photographers will inspire you, and may even set you on your own path to success… Editor Ross Hoddinott is among the UK’s leading outdoor photographers, and the winner of awards including Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year and British Wildlife Photographer of the Year. He is the author of photography books including The Landscape Photography Workshop and The Art of Landscape Photography. His clients include the National Trust, and he was a member of the 2020VISION photo-team: the largest multimedia conservation project ever staged in the UK. Foreword author Robert Macfarlane is one of our leading writers on landscape, language, nature and environmentalism. He is a Fellow of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and his essays appear regularly in the Guardian and The New York Times. His books include the 2003 winner of the Guardian First Book and Somerset Maugham awards, Mountains of the Mind (2003) and his work has been published in over 20 countries and adapted for television and radio by the BBC.
Views: 1837 Ammonite Press
Short Short Stories
 
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The Good Stuff comes to you in playlists of videos covering many styles and topics all around a theme. This week's theme: MINIATURE! We asked you to send us some short stories! You did! Here they are in a video we made! Thanks to everyone who submitted! http://www.youtube.com/video_response_view_all?v=f8zvHWkTOmc insert channel URLs here ________________ THE PLAYLIST Opener http://bit.ly/15ZQy2Z All About Mini Golf http://bit.ly/1b8NKVX Could Nanotechnology Cure Cancer? http://bit.ly/1b8VLdv Why Does The Universe Exist? http://bit.ly/18vxKZB Short Short Stories http://bit.ly/13ZyHLC PREVIOUS PLAYLISTS Origins http://bit.ly/19gbHEG Airplanes! http://bit.ly/15tF7zp Rockstar Lifestyle http://bit.ly/14MXgXo ________________ The Good Stuff elsewhere: YouTube: http://youtube.com/TheGoodStuff Facebook: http://fb.com/TheGoodStuffShow Twitter: http://twitter.com/GoodStuffShow Tumblr: http://tumblr.com/goodstuffshow ________________ ________________ Produced by Craig Benzine, Sam Grant, Matt Weber, David Wolff and Ryan Wolff
Views: 22844 The Good Stuff
51: "Who Was To Blame?" by Anton Chekhov
 
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Love our shorts? Share them (and earn swag) at Share.morningshort.com. Enjoy This Morning's Amazing short story. Morning Short produces one short audiobook every morning. Get your daily story via email: (http://Invite.MorningShort.com). -----What is Morning Short? ------- Morning Short is a podcast/newsletter that shares one short story every morning. Our stories are like little audiobooks, and feature everything from romance, to sci-fi thrillers, to drama, and even detective/crime fiction. We sometimes even welcome special guests to our story, like Sherlock Holmes, everyone's favorite sleuth (or at least ours). Other popular genres are fantasy, comedy, satire, and tragedy. We even read some narrative poetry sometimes! (Some say we're a bit like Audible for short stories) -----Why listen to Morning Short audiobooks? ------- Most of our readers just want a great story, every morning. They love the mystery aspect of it too, not knowing what story/genre/author will come next. Many readers use our service to improve their writing skills. We don't offer writing tips, but we feature a wide variety of legendary authors from around the world. Reading good literature is one of the best ways to improve your own writing skill. Others listen to us to improve their English. We're not an English-language course, but our stories are helpful for grasping idioms and english writing styles.
Views: 2174 Morning Short
[Premiere]: "Her Lover" By Maxim Gorky
 
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Morning Short is back, with a third season of amazing curated short stories! Today’s episode is: A story written by the Russian writer Maxim Gorky, who created the socialist-realism literatary style. Learn more: http://listen.morningshort.com - Discuss: http://reddit.com/r/morningshort More Context: This particular story is gritty, but sweet. The characters (Theresa, the student) are imperfect and complex, but good at heart. There's a real humanity to them, which is why we selected it. Story Genres: Fiction, Literature, Russian, Soviet, Socialist Realism, Drama Famous books by this author: The Mother Children of the Sun My Childhood And many others. -----What is Morning Short? ------- Morning Short is a podcast and daily newsletter featuring amazing, curated short stories, handpicked for you. Our stories are like little audiobooks, and feature everything from romance, to sci-fi thrillers, to drama, and even detective/crime fiction. We sometimes even welcome special guests to our story, like Sherlock Holmes, everyone's favorite sleuth (or at least ours). Other popular genres are fantasy, comedy, satire, and tragedy. We even read some narrative poetry sometimes! (Some say we're a bit like Audible for short stories) -----Why listen to Morning Short audiobooks? ------- Most of our readers just want a great story, every day or every week. They love the mystery aspect of it too, not knowing what story/genre/author will come next. Many readers use our service to improve their writing skills. We don't offer writing tips, but we feature a wide variety of legendary authors from around the world. Reading good literature is one of the best ways to improve your own writing skill. Others listen to us to improve their English. We're not an English-language course, but our stories are helpful for grasping idioms and english writing styles. They’re meant to entertain you while you commute or work out, help you improve your reading and writing skills, and generally just make you happier. Enjoy our amazing fiction! If you like the short audiobook format, let us know!
Views: 173 Morning Short
The Master of the World [Full Audiobook] by Jules Verne
 
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The Master of the World [Full Audiobook] by Jules Verne Chief Inspector Strock gets the tough cases. When a volcano suddenly appears to threaten mountain towns of North Carolina amid the non-volcanic Blue Ridge Mountains, Strock is posted to determine the danger. When an automobile race in Wisconsin is interrupted by the unexpected appearance of a vehicle traveling at multiples of the top speed of the entrants, Strock is consulted. When an odd-shaped boat is sighted moving at impossible speeds off the New England coast, Stock and his boss begin to wonder if the incidents are related. And when Strock gets a hand-lettered note warning him to abandon his investigation, on pain of death, he is intrigued rather than deterred. Set in a period when gasoline engines were in their infancy and automobiles were rare, and when even Chief Inspectors had to engage a carriage and horses to move about, the appearance of a vehicle that can move at astounding speeds on land, on water - and as later revealed, underwater and through the air - marks a technological advance far beyond the reach of nations. It is technology invented by and for the sole benefit of a man who styles himself 00:00:00 - Chapter 1 00:15:41 - Chapter 2 00:32:12 - Chapter 3 00:55:21 - Chapter 4 01:12:26 - Chapter 5 01:29:36 - Chapter 6 01:40:51 - Chapter 7 01:58:30 - Chapter 8 02:18:04 - Chapter 9 02:20:24 - Chapter 10 02:34:56 - Chapter 11 02:53:28 - Chapter 12 03:11:30 - Chapter 13 03:29:32 - Chapter 14 03:53:29 - Chapter 15 04:11:40 - Chapter 16 04:23:08 - Chapter 17 04:48:36 - Chapter 18 Other Adventures by Jules Verne (playlist) https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1ANDYo2oT4wfh_AqiPri8G6-vCrLrtat English Audio Books - best audio books, free audio books, audio books free, librivox, best audiobooks, best free audio books online, library programs, summer reading #audiobook #audiobooks #englishaudiobooks #summerreading
Views: 6318 English Audio Books
Discovering the Creative Impulse
 
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A documentary style look at how creativity is cultivated through the class "Discovering the Creative Impulse." Dr. Harold Popp has developed the class over the past 20 years, writing the textbook and teaching it at both Wichita State University and Indiana University. This video follows along over the course of a semester, through class observations and interviewing both students and the professor multiple times. The transformation and development throughout the class is obvious even to the students themselves, which they exhibit both in the work produced and the self actualization shared in one-on-one interviews.
Views: 146 Debbi Ponella
Purple Dwarf Tower: Building Windmills (original eclectic song about wanderlust and money)
 
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Lifestyle clashes between materialism and bohemian wanderlust in this love relationship break up (ala Somerset Maugham's Razor's Edge). Style/Genre: Electronic, Ballad Lyrics I'm building windmills, all over town, I get around Sitting in cafes on old boulevards, the world goes around My blue bonnet baby, has skipped out of town She's left with my heart and my coin, she's gone So building windmills is what I do best, just look around A brief moment's pause on ocean's fair shore, is all I'm allowed My blue bonnet baby, has left for the sound Of change in her pockets and one caret lockets, she's gone So windmills and memories are all I have left, as I sit around Kicking at cans in lonely back alleys, where I can be found Where I can be found Video by Purple Dwarf Tower, original song 'Building Windmills' written and recorded by Purple Dwarf Tower, copyright 2012.
Views: 67 PurpleDwarfTower
In Defence of Ignorance by A.G.Gardiner for LT grade exam 2018 & others
 
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Hello dosto.. Today we discussed very important topic -In Defence of Ignorance by A.G.Gardiner.. For more video..... click our youtube ..link given below... https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCp4ltPr04va6MWSrkKNlGNQ For more video SUBSCRIBE OUR youtube chennal Thank for watching
Dream Children By Charles Lamb: About Essay, Summary & theme
 
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Dream Children By Charles Lamb. About Essay 0:09 Summary 2:44 Theme 7:40 The essay is one of the ‘Essays of Elia’. The essay expresses the feelings of loss and regret faced by the narrator. It is based on the description of a place, the relationships and the feelings that have been part of the narrator’s past. -Learn English Through Prose -Learn English Through Story
What is COMEDY OF MANNERS? What does COMEDY OF MANNERS mean? COMEDY OF MANNERS meaning
 
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✪✪✪✪✪ WORK FROM HOME! Looking for WORKERS for simple Internet data entry JOBS. $15-20 per hour. SIGN UP here - http://jobs.theaudiopedia.com ✪✪✪✪✪ ✪✪✪✪✪ The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiopedia_8069473 ✪✪✪✪✪ What is COMEDY OF MANNERS? What does COMEDY OF MANNERS mean? COMEDY OF MANNERS meaning - COMEDY OF MANNERS definition - COMEDY OF MANNERS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. The comedy of manners is an entertainment form which satirizes the manners and affectations of a social class or of multiple classes, often represented by stereotypical stock characters. For example, the miles gloriosus ("boastful soldier") in ancient times, the fop and the rake during the English Restoration, or an old person pretending to be young. Restoration comedy is used as a synonym for "comedy of manners". The plot of the comedy, often concerned with scandal, is generally less important than its witty dialogue. A great writer of comedies of manners was Oscar Wilde, his most famous play being The Importance of Being Earnest. The comedy of manners was first developed in the new comedy of the Ancient Greek playwright Menander. His style, elaborate plots, and stock characters were imitated by the Roman playwrights Plautus and Terence, whose comedies were widely known and copied during the Renaissance. The best-known comedies of manners, however, may well be those of the French playwright Moliere, who satirized the hypocrisy and pretension of the ancien régime in such plays as L'École des femmes (The School for Wives, 1662), Le Misanthrope (The Misanthrope, 1666), and most famously Tartuffe (1664). The comedy of manners has been employed by Roman satirists since as early as the first century BC. Horace's Satire 1.9 is a prominent example, in which the persona is unable to express his wish for his companion to leave, but instead subtly implies so through wit. William Shakespeare's Much Ado about Nothing might be considered the first comedy of manners In England, but the genre really flourished during the Restoration period. Restoration comedy, which was influenced by Ben Jonson's comedy of humours, made fun of affected wit and acquired follies of the time. The masterpieces of the genre were the plays of William Wycherley (The Country Wife, 1675) and William Congreve (The Way of the World, 1700). In the late 18th century Oliver Goldsmith (She Stoops to Conquer, 1773) and Richard Brinsley Sheridan (The Rivals, 1775; The School for Scandal, 1777) revived the form. The tradition of elaborate, artificial plotting and epigrammatic dialogue was carried on by the Irish playwright Oscar Wilde in Lady Windermere's Fan (1892) and The Importance of Being Earnest (1895). In the 20th century, the comedy of manners reappeared in the plays of the British dramatists Noël Coward (Hay Fever, 1925) and Somerset Maugham and the novels of P.G. Wodehouse, as well as various British sitcoms. The Carry On films are a direct descendant of the comedy of manners style. The term comedy of menace, which British drama critic Irving Wardle based on the subtitle of The Lunatic View: A Comedy of Menace (1958), by David Campton, is a jocular play-on-words derived from the "comedy of manners" (menace being manners pronounced with a somewhat Judeo-English accent). Pinter's play The Homecoming has been described as a mid-twentieth-century "comedy of manners". In Boston Marriage (1999), David Mamet chronicles a sexual relationship between two women, one of whom has her eye on yet another young woman (who never appears, but who is the target of a seduction scheme). Periodically, the two women make their serving woman the butt of haughty jokes, serving to point up the satire on class. Though displaying the verbal dexterity one associates with both the playwright and the genre, the patina of wit occasionally erupts into shocking crudity. Other contemporary examples include Douglas Carter Beane's As Bees in Honey Drown, The Country Club, The Little Dog Laughed, and the "Jeeves and Wooster" series by P.G. Wodehouse. The television program Absolutely Fabulous is another contemporary example of the comedy of manners.
Views: 10774 The Audiopedia
Books about Savile Row (various authors) reviewed by Nicholas Hoare
 
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In a city renowned for its bespoke tailoring, Savile Row reigns supreme. Still going strong, two centuries in, this innocuous West End street remains London's, if not the world's, sartorial arbiter for both the male and female of the species, through its unmistakable style and timeless panache. "One Savile Row: The Invention of the English Gentleman", compiled by Gieves and Hawkes, heads the literary pack, and not just for gents. Holding no less than three Royal Warrants - those of the Queen, the Duke of Edinburgh and the Prince of Wales - this venerable firm, which outfitted Nelson, the Duke of Wellington and innumerable blades since, carries on a tradition that is threatened with extinction: hand-cut, hand-sewn and hand-crafted clothing that will last the wearer a lifetime. Its history alone is worth the price of admission. Further down the street, such landmarks are to be found as Huntsman (whose lead cutter, Richard Anderson, has himself written a book, entitled, predictably, "Bespoke"), Hardy Amies, Henry Poole, Hayward, and Kilgour. There is also, of course, Anderson & Sheppard, whose own book, "A Style is Born" is itself a visual delight. Co-edited by Graydon Carter, no less, this handsome tome embodies everything a fine outfitter stands for (e.g. Alec Guinness, Noel Coward and Somerset Maugham). Finally, there is the fashionisto, James Sherwood (not to be confused with the JS, of that ilk, who so inspiredly revived The Venice Simplon Orient-Express), whose "Bespoke: The Men's Style of Savile Row" tackles the entire street. As one-stop shopping, as it were, this one covers the gamut, a chapter per tailor, and is warmly recommended by a lifelong supporter (of the street, that is). More video book reviews at https://thisoldHoarehouse.com
William Schallert 1922-2016
 
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William Joseph Schallert (July 6, 1922 – May 8, 2016) was an American character actor who appeared in many films and in such television series as Perry Mason; The Smurfs; Jefferson Drum; Philip Marlowe; The Rat Patrol; Gunsmoke; Star Trek; The Patty Duke Show; 87th Precinct; The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis; The Waltons; Hawaii Five-O, Quincy, M.E.; The Partridge Family; Bonanza; Wanted: Dead or Alive; Leave It to Beaver; The Dick Van Dyke Show; Love, American Style; Get Smart; Lawman; Combat!; The Wild Wild West; and in later years, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine; Medium and True Blood. As with many other character actors with long careers, Schallert's face was more recognizable than his name. William "Bill" Schallert was born in Los Angeles, the son of Edwin Francis Schallert, a longtime drama critic for the Los Angeles Times, and Elza Emily Schallert (née Baumgarten), a magazine writer and radio host. He began acting while a student at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles and, in 1946, helped found the Circle Theatre with Sydney Chaplin and several fellow students. In 1948, Schallert was directed by Sydney's father, the famous Charlie Chaplin, in a staging of Somerset Maugham's Rain. Schallert appeared in supporting roles on numerous television programs since the early 1950s, including four episodes in Dick Powell's Zane Grey Theatre between 1958 and 1961. He was in Gunsmoke in 1957 and in 1958 and The Partridge Family, as a very humble folk-singing guitar player with "Stage Fright", in 1971. He appeared three times as Major Karl Richmond on NBC's Steve Canyon, starring Dean Fredericks in the title role. Schallert also appeared in several movies. One of his early cinematic roles was a brief uncredited performance as a police detective in The Reckless Moment (1949) with Joan Bennett and James Mason. He had roles in The Man from Planet X (1951) with Robert Clarke, The Tarnished Angels (1958) with Robert Stack, Blue Denim (1959) with Brandon deWilde, Pillow Talk (1959) with Doris Day and Rock Hudson, Speedway (1968) with Elvis Presley, The Jerk (1979) with Steve Martin, Teachers (1984) with Nick Nolte, and Innerspace (1987), in which he played Martin Short's doctor. Schallert was probably best known as Martin Lane on The Patty Duke Show. He also appeared as a wise teacher, Mr. Leander Pomfritt, on The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis, and as The Admiral on Get Smart. On the two former shows he worked opposite actress Jean Byron. Schallert made three guest appearances on CBS's Perry Mason between 1957–1962, including the role of Donald Graves in the series' fifth episode, "The Case of the Sulky Girl", and Dr. Bradbury in the 1961 episode, "The Case of the Misguided Missile". He is also remembered for playing the role of Nilz Baris in the Star Trek episode "The Trouble With Tribbles". He also appeared in the archive footage of that episode which was used in the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode "Trials and Tribble-ations". Schallert appeared in DS9 himself, in the second season episode "Sanctuary", in which he played Varani, a Bajoran musician. Schallert played the role of Carson Drew in the television series The Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries (1977–1979), featuring Pamela Sue Martin as Nancy Drew. In addition to his onscreen performances, Schallert did voiceover work for numerous television and radio commercials over the years. Among these were a recurring role as "Milton the Toaster" in animated commercials for Kellogg's Pop-Tarts. Schallert had the rare distinction of appearing in both the original movie version of In The Heat of The Night (1967) and the later NBC TV version in 1992. In 2004, TV Guide recognized Schallert's portrayal of Martin Lane on The Patty Duke Show as No. 39 on its list of "50 Greatest TV Dads. Schallert served as president of the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) from 1979 to 1981, and afterwards remained active in SAG projects, including serving as a Trustee of the SAG Pension and Health Plans since 1983, and of the Motion Picture and Television Fund since 1977. Schallert continued to work steadily as an actor in later life, appearing in a 2008 episode of How I Met Your Mother, the HBO television movie Recount (2008) as U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice John Paul Stevens, the HBO series True Blood and his distinctive voice continued to bring him work for commercial and animation voiceovers. His last television appearance came in 2014 on an episode of the sitcom 2 Broke Girls. Schallert passed away on May 8. 2016, at the age of 93.
Views: 2750 MrSteveRiker
Of Studies by Francis Bacon | Bangla Lecture | Prose [for Hon.  1st Year] Part-1
 
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"Of Studies" by Francis Bacon | Bengali Lecture | Prose [for Hon. 1st Year] Part-1: https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=VLVw-J1p9NQ Part-2: https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=pQxQ79scyDM Of Studies Francis Bacon STUDIES serve for delight, for ornament, and for ability. Their chief use for delight, is in privateness and retiring; for ornament, is in discourse; and for ability, is in the judgment, and disposition (arrangement) of business. For expert men can execute, and perhaps judge of particulars (small Part), one by one; but the general counsels (suggestion), and the plots (bad suggestion) and marshalling of affairs, come best, from those that are learned. To spend too much time in studies is sloth (laziness); to use them too much for ornament, is affectation (air, pretend); to make judgment wholly by their rules, is the humor of a scholar. They perfect nature, and are perfected by experience: for natural abilities are like natural plants, that need proyning, by study; and studies themselves, do give forth directions too much at large, except they be bounded in by experience. Crafty men contemn studies, simple men admire them, and wise men use them; for they teach not their own use; but that is a wisdom without them, and above them, won by observation. Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider. Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested; that is, some books are to be read only in parts; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention. Some books also may be read by deputy, and extracts made of them by others; but that would be only in the less important arguments, and the meaner sort of books, else distilled books are like common distilled waters, flashy things. Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man. And therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit: and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know, that he doth not. Histories make men wise; poets witty; the mathematics subtile; natural philosophy deep; moral grave; logic and rhetoric able to contend. Abeunt studia in mores. Nay, there is no stond or impediment in the wit, but may be wrought out by fit studies; like as diseases of the body, may have appropriate exercises. Bowling is good for the stone and reins; shooting for the lungs and breast; gentle walking for the stomach; riding for the head; and the like. So if a man’s wit be wandering, let him study the mathematics; for in demonstrations, if his wit be called away never so little, he must begin again. If his wit be not apt to distinguish or find differences, let him study the Schoolmen; for they are cymini sectores. If he be not apt to beat over matters, and to call up one thing to prove and illustrate another, let him study 197 the lawyers’ cases. So every defect of the mind, may have a special receipt. ‘’ Bacon expresses that studies “serve for Delight, for Ornament, and for Ability.” For delight, Bacon means one’s personal, private education; for “Ornament,” he means in conversation between and among others, which Bacon labels as “Discourse”. Studies for “Ability” lead one to judgment in business and related pursuits. From Bacon’s perspective, men with skilled experience can carry out plans and understand particular circumstances, but men who study are better able to understand important political matters and know how to deal with problem according to their severity like “Marshalling of Affairs”. Bacon encourages studies but at the same time, he warns that 1) too much studying leads to laziness; 2) if one uses one’s knowledge too often in conversation with others, then one is showing off; and 3) to be guided solely by one’s studies one becomes a scholar rather than a practical man. Bacon’s argument about the value of studies is that studies are wonderful only if influenced by experience because a person’s natural abilities are enhanced by studies, but studies without experience, lead to confusion.
Views: 25042 Cloud School Pro
In Defence Of Ignorance By AG Gardiner,LT English Literature
 
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Arvindo English is a free Channel for English learners. We study how to learn English speaking easily. You'll also see lessons for English speaking practice, tenses in English grammar with examples. You will find free English vocabulary Videos, English grammar Videos, English exercises and English lessons. Thousands of English Videos are waiting for you. They will help you learn English. We are keen to provide the best training you have received ever. So that you may easily Crack the competition ahead and achieve your dream goal. Almost all National and International Courses of English are dealt at the center by the best faculty members. A number of students Have got selection in MNC’S and various sector including BANK, SSC, IAS, IES, PCS, NDA, NET, PGT, TGT etc. We deal language from all aspects including Literature, grammar, pronunciation And develop the personality completely dealing with speaking, listening, reading and writing skills At all nooks and corners of a personality. ☞ Thanks for watching! ☞ Please share and like if you enjoyed the video :) thanks so much ♥ For More Interesting updates Subscribe My Channel on YouTube and like Facebook Page Or Visit Official Website ►Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ArvindoEnglish ►YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/ArvindoEnglish ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/ArvindoEnglish ►Official Website: http://ArvindoEnglish.com Design and managed by ScimoX Product and Services Pvt.Ltd.For more Details, visit our Facebook Page Or Website ►Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ScimoX ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/Scimox ►Official Website: http://scimox.com
Views: 12692 Arvindo English
Listen To "Laura" By Saki
 
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Love our shorts? Share them (and earn swag) at Share.morningshort.com. Enjoy This Morning's Amazing short story. Morning Short produces one short audiobook every morning. Get your daily story via email: (http://Invite.MorningShort.com). -----What is Morning Short? ------- Morning Short is a podcast/newsletter that shares one short story every morning. Our stories are like little audiobooks, and feature everything from romance, to sci-fi thrillers, to drama, and even detective/crime fiction. We sometimes even welcome special guests to our story, like Sherlock Holmes, everyone's favorite sleuth (or at least ours). Other popular genres are fantasy, comedy, satire, and tragedy. We even read some narrative poetry sometimes! (Some say we're a bit like Audible for short stories) -----Why listen to Morning Short audiobooks? ------- Most of our readers just want a great story, every morning. They love the mystery aspect of it too, not knowing what story/genre/author will come next. Many readers use our service to improve their writing skills. We don't offer writing tips, but we feature a wide variety of legendary authors from around the world. Reading good literature is one of the best ways to improve your own writing skill. Others listen to us to improve their English. We're not an English-language course, but our stories are helpful for grasping idioms and english writing styles.
Views: 375 Morning Short
Frederic Raphael - Bright people aren’t always the most tactful (130/144)
 
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To listen to more of Frederic Raphael’s stories, go to the playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NMEcyMudjHY&list=PLVV0r6CmEsFy1lPaJ5aCO1R19vqlZ7Wes Born in 1931 in America, Frederic Raphael is a writer who has written more than 20 novels, five volumes of short stories and biographies. He also won an Oscar for writing the script to "Darling" and wrote the screenplay for the acclaimed film "Eyes Wide Shut". [Listener: Christopher Sykes] TRANSCRIPT: I've known a lot of bright people and I've walked away from a lot of them for one reason and another. George Steiner was perhaps the most famous. I was kind of proud to know George Steiner when I first met him, actually at Michael Ayrton's house. And George was perfectly friendly and he wrote me very effusive, rather continental letters in which told me of all the famous people who had solicited his lectures and attendance at theirs and so on. And he used to end up with rather effusive statements like, 'I am aching to see you'. I can't say I ever ached to see George, but I did go through the motions of aching, I suppose, or something like that. Beetle did not like him on sight. And when Beetle doesn't like somebody on sight, she doesn't often take a second look. So I used to see George in a slightly furtive way – go over to Cambridge to his house and so on. And then one day, I dedicated a book to him and it had an illustrations by Sarah in it. I wasn't going to tell this story, but I damn well am. And I... it was dedicated to him in print and I sent him the book. When he wrote back he said not: I really enjoyed your book, or how clever of you to have done all these different versions of Greek myths in various styles from cinema to acrostics and all the rest of it. He said: what a shame that Sarah did those dire – D I R E – paintings. Wouldn't it have been wonderful if Michael was still alive? Now, what would drive anybody to be as honest as that? When I say that I'm not afraid of saying whatever I want to say, I can also add that courtesy is part of the irony which I enjoy. And since, if somebody dedicates a book to you, the correct thing to do is to thank them for it, you can choose the terms in which you do the thanking with some care and somebody outside the loop might spot the fact that saying: this is one of the most interesting books I've ever read, means it isn't the most interesting, meaning you didn't like it all that much, or whatever. But you do not, when a book is dedicated to you, have the right to write anything except : this is one of the greatest treasures that I shall ever have in my library and I cannot tell you how much it means to me that you have done that. That's the number that you're supposed to do. You can play it however you like in waltz time or rumba, but you have to do it. And he didn't. And I wrote back to George and said, I know exactly how you will defend what you have said. You will allude to the etymology of the word 'dire' in dirus the Latin, as I know you know, for something which is dangerous, dark, has something to do with the underworld, a sort of godly quality, but you don't mean it. What you mean is: I dare you now to say that you will never speak to me again rather than defend your daughter. And the answer is, 'Goodbye, George.' I've never spoken to him since. They did write when Sarah died and they did send their love, and, God help me, in the state that we were then in – and we answered all the letters, which people often don't, by the way, very odd that – I replied, 'love.' But I wrote 'love' in the Oxford style, which is more or less the same as 'yours faithfully' or unfaithfully. I've never spoken to George since and I have not missed him. He does a lot of that. He is, in many ways, what Charlie Broad, one of my Cambridge philosopher professors would call, 'a silly clever'. There's always something he does which mucks it up. For instance, in his book about the Antigones, Sophocles' Antigone and the versions which then followed it, he says that the Greek choruses were composed in iambics. Well, they're not. It doesn't really matter. Who, as they say, is counting? But the answer is I am. And if you're going to be a smartass, you'd better be a very smartass. I mean, John Carey, who has been the lead reviewer or the chief reviewer of the 'Sunday Times' for as long as I can remember – and I don't read his stuff with any great zeal – wrote in a book of his, deploring the intellectuals and their pretensions in the world, happened in the same book to refer to Ida as a Greek god. Well, Ida is a mountain in Crete. Does it matter? Who's counting? I'm counting. If you're going to tell me that I'm a smartass, but you're an even smarter-ass, you better be one. That's the game we play, isn't it? Read the full transcript on [https://www.webofstories.com/play/frederic.raphael/130].
The Letter (1940) -- OPENING TITLE SEQUENCE
 
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The Letter (1940) 95 min - Crime | Drama | Film-Noir - 23 November 1940 (USA) The wife of a rubber plantation administrator shoots a man to death and claims it was self-defense; a letter in her own hand may prove her undoing. Director: William Wyler Writers: W. Somerset Maugham (by), Howard Koch (screen play) Stars: Bette Davis, Herbert Marshall, James Stephenson http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0032701
Views: 3902 MovieTitleScreens
Writing Habits TAG!
 
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TAG Time! Original TAG! - http://youtu.be/Vu8PyJCHHOk Wordsofareader - http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyihr6dvmH3XGDyBHfdhhFw Cherie Moore - http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWoR5TUGLl5iRmIrEXRgzTA Caitlin Plavala - http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCd-thFZmHK-z8Ou5HcmFATA Turtle Sympathy - http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMInkxIxbgLHi-TlsNpGbyw Questions - 1. Typed or Handwritten? 2. Cursive or Printed? 3. Show us your favourite pen. 4. Where do you like to write? (Location) 5. Who are your five favourite authors in terms of authorial style? 6. What are you your three favourite books on writing? 7. Have you ever competed in NaNoWriMo? 8. Have you ever won NaNoWriMo? 9. Have you ever had anything published? 10. What projects are you working on now? 11. What is your soundtrack to writing? 12. Do you have a writing pump-up song?
Views: 105 Morgan Gilmour
In praise of ignorance by Hilaire Bellock summary in hindi (raj english)
 
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Most welcome to all of you on my youtube channel. It's really pleasure for me your visiting here. Subscribe my channel-https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWpZv7W_3ZUW-5rm7d68b6Q Follow us to facebook page-https://www.facebook.com/Raj-english-317855995465285/ Follow us to Instagram-https://www.instagram.com/md.afsaralam.1272/?hl=en #rajenglish
Views: 321 Raj English
Of Studies by Francis Bacon | Bengali Lecture | Prose [for Hon.  1st Year] Part-2
 
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"Of Studies" by Francis Bacon | Bengali Lecture | Prose [for Hon. 1st Year] Part-2 Part-1: https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=VLVw-J1p9NQ Part-2: https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=pQxQ79scyDM Some books also may be read by deputy, and extracts made of them by others; but that would be only in the less important arguments, and the meaner sort of books, else distilled books are like common distilled waters, flashy things. Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man. And therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit: and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know, that he doth not. Histories make men wise; poets witty; the mathematics subtile; natural philosophy deep; moral grave; logic and rhetoric able to contend. Abeunt studia in mores. Nay, there is no stond or impediment in the wit, but may be wrought out by fit studies; like as diseases of the body, may have appropriate exercises. Bowling is good for the stone and reins; shooting for the lungs and breast; gentle walking for the stomach; riding for the head; and the like. So if a man’s wit be wandering, let him study the mathematics; for in demonstrations, if his wit be called away never so little, he must begin again. If his wit be not apt to distinguish or find differences, let him study the Schoolmen; for they are cymini sectores. If he be not apt to beat over matters, and to call up one thing to prove and illustrate another, let him study 197 the lawyers’ cases. So every defect of the mind, may have a special receipt.
Views: 10079 Cloud School Pro
The $30,000 Bequest and Other Stories [Full Audiobook] by Mark Twain
 
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The $30,000 Bequest and Other Stories [Full Audiobook] by Mark Twain The $30,000 Bequest and Other Stories is a 1906 collection of 30 comic short stories by American humorist and writer Mark Twain. Published just 4 years before his death, this was the last time he chose works from throughout his career, in an effort to show the diversity of his style and the breadth and depth of his interests. 00:00:00 The $30,000 Bequest 01:13:28 A Dog's Tale 01:39:18 Was It Heaven? Or Hell? 02:26:42 A Cure for the Blues 03:16:53 The Curious Book 05:09:04 The Californian's Tale 05:27:11 A Helpless Situation 05:40:31 A Telephonic Conversation 05:46:41 Edward Mills and George B 06:01:24 The Five Boons of Life 06:07:55 The First Writing-Machines 06:15:32 Italian Without a Master 06:32:53 Italian With Grammar 06:50:48 A Burlesque Biography 07:04:27 How To Tell A Story 07:17:57 General Washington's Negro Body-Servant 07:27:22 Wit Inspirations of the 07:34:31 An Entertaining Article 07:55:54 A Letter To The Secretary of the Treasury & And Amended Obituaries 08:01:57 A Monument to Adam & Amended Obituaries 08:09:36 Introduction to The 08:16:26 Advice to Little Girls & Post-Mortem Poetry 08:31:18 The Danger of Lying in Bed 08:39:03 Portrait of King William III 08:45:39 Does the Race of Man Love a Lord? 09:14:46 Extracts From Adam's Diary 09:39:57 Eve's Diary 10:04:01 Extract From Adam's Diary English Audio Books - best audio books, free audio books, audio books free, librivox, best audiobooks, best free audio books online, library programs, summer reading #audiobook #audiobooks #englishaudiobooks #summerreading
Views: 305 English Audio Books
R&B Songwriter- rb song writer (r&b songwriter)
 
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R&B Songwriter- rb song writer (r&b songwriter)
Views: 75 R&B Songwriter
The Luncheon
 
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Views: 30012 TCM
Mandarin Oriental, Bangkok: More Than 140 Years of History and Heritage
 
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Welcome to Mandarin Oriental, Bangkok, a luxurious 5 star hotel along the Chao Phraya River steeped in history and built since 1876. Numerous authors once resided within the hotel’s grounds and were inspired Built in 1876 and ideally located on the banks of the Chao Phraya River, Mandarin Oriental, Bangkok has been an inspiration to a host of world-renowned writers from Joseph Conrad, Somerset Maugham to Wilbur Smith and John Le Carre. Mandarin Oriental, Bangkok boasts an international reputation for splendid service, style and grace and facilities including eight restaurants. The hotel’s private teakwood shuttle boats provide daily access to the world famous Thai Cooking School, the hotel’s Thai restaurant, the award-winning Oriental Spa and Health Centre located across the River; as well as the nearest skytrain station (SaphanTaksin) and River City Shopping Centre. Hit play and join us as we take you to see the lovely sights and spots within this truly charming hotel.
Views: 200 CuisineWineAsia
On National Prejudices (Hindi) | Oliver Goldsmith | part-2 | Easy Explaination and Analysis ||
 
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On National Prejudices (Hindi) | Oliver Goldsmith | Part -2 | Easy Explaination and Analysis | English Literature || Hi! I am Pooja. Welcome to my channel. Happy to help. About the Video - "On National Prejudices" is an essay written by Oliver Goldsmith. It was first published in the British Magazine in August 1760. In his essay, Goldsmith argues that it is possible to love one's own country without hating the natives of other countries. Thank you very much!! On National Prejudices Part - 1 - https://youtu.be/xmluyu5K-5g My other videos and playlists- Metaphysical poetry and poets in hindi-https://youtu.be/ZRSm7W-NcWw TS.Eliot's Essay The metaphysical poets in hindi -https://youtu.be/IV9LYljFdO0 Meg -3 And UGC NET: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLlPBbTqDWD7ShyvzvP4vUMK0uDhklEVf6 Meg-8: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLlPBbTqDWD7RfJDUpEwwK99DXqkVrWwvp Social media links- Facebook- https://m.facebook.com/literaturekidunia951/ Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/literaturekidunia/?hl=en Email - [email protected] #OnNationalPrejudices #OliverGoldsmithEssay #LiteratureKiDunia #EnglishLiterature
Views: 330 Literature Ki Dunia
Listen To New Radio Drama: Morse: In the Shallows. BBC Radio 4. 14th July 2018.
 
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Terrible things happen even in beautiful places and among highly educated people. Morse, Lewis and Strange are back on their criminally fertile Oxford patch – dealing with a mysterious pair of Oxford students who appear to be fish out of water, a Don found dead in the river, and an attractive philosopher who pleads with Morse to drop his investigation to save her career. It’s still the early 1990s when computers, mobiles, digital media and sophisticated forensic techniques are not yet in use. Morse’s detection methods rely on instinct, acutely honed observational skills and dogged gumshoe perseverance. Colin Dexter’s Oxford detectives feature in a story devised by former Morse TV writer Alma Cullen, adapted by Richard Stoneman. Chief Inspector Morse – Neil Pearson If you enjoy Morse, Lewis and Endeavour visit my website: https://morseandlewisandendeavour.com/
Views: 28133 Kit Sullivan