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Melting ice sculptures mark 100 days to UN Climate Change conference

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(28 Aug 2009) FILE: Tibet - 18 June, 2009 1. Various aerials of Snow Mountain Beijing - 28 August, 2009 2. Wide of Ditan or Temple of Earth, pan to ice sculptures of children 3. Close up of ice sculpture child's head 4. Mid of ice sculpture children 5. Close up of poster on ground reading (English) "tck tck tck the world is ready, Copenhagen", tilt up to ice sculpture exhibition 6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Vinuta Gopal, Climate and Energy Campaign Manager, Greenpeace India: "The situation is extremely urgent, and that is exactly what we are symbolising today with these ice sculptures of a hundred children because there are a hundred days left to Copenhagen, where we need to reach a clear plan on how the world is going to save itself from catastrophe climate change." 7. Low angle shot of sun glinting above ice sculpture 8. Close up of sculpture melting, ice dripping 9. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Yang Ailun, Climate and Energy Campaign Manager, Greenpeace China: "We hope to use the melting of the ice sculpture to demonstrate to people that at the same time the glaciers in the Himalayan and Tibetan regions are melting at an unprecedented rate because of climate change. And this will severely affect the water sources for millions of people across Asia. So at the 100 day countdown to the Copenhagen meeting we launched this campaign to show the affects on climate change." 10. Tilt down ice sculpture of boy 11. Wide tracking shot of ice sculptures, to close of dripping ice from sculpture 12. Wide of mother and daughter looking at sculptures 13. Close up of sun glinting through ice sculpture 14. SOUNDBITE: (Mandarin) Vox Pop, Hu Xin, visitor to exhibition: "This is for our next generation, next, next and next generation, so they can have water to drink, and enjoy a better climate, and it is educational for the little children." 15. Close up of melting ice sculpture 16. Ice sculpture melting, falling over and breaking STORYLINE: Environmentalists marked the 100 day countdown to the UN meeting on Climate Change in Copenhagen with the unveiling of 100 ice sculptures at a park in Beijing on Friday. Environmental pressure group, Greenpeace warned that more than one (b) billion people were threatened with water shortages from climate change affecting the Himalayan and Tibetan regions. Greenpeace said that the disappearance of the glaciers in the Himalayas threatens the fresh water supply to one-fifth of the world's population. At the Ditan, or Temple of Earth park in Beijing, Greenpeace highlighted the upcoming climate conference's challenges by placing 100 melting ice sculptures of children in a park under warm sun.| The ice sculptures were carved from frozen water from the Yangtze, Ganges and Yellow Rivers, the three main rivers that can all be traced back to the glacial water melt in the Himalayas. Vinuta Gopal, Climate and Energy Campaign Manager for Greenpeace India said the melting sculptures were used to symbolise the urgent consequences of the glacial melt. "The situation is extremely urgent, and that is exactly what we are symbolising today with these ice sculptures of 100 children because there are 100 days left to Copenhagen where we need to reach a clear plan how the world is going to save itself from catastrophe, climate change," she said. Greenpeace estimates that up to one fifth of the planet's population will be affected by the melting glaciers on the Tibetan Plateau. Yang Ailun, Climate and Energy campaign manager for Greenpeace China said that they launched the campaign 100-days ahead of Copenhagen to encourage world leaders to take action. Young Beijing residents were also visiting the ice sculptures. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/400583b1ffb3f0cd3a141fcb6bc17c9a Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
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